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Saturday, November 10, 2012 at 10:51 am

Photos: Artist opens new show this week at Roz Steiner Gallery

post by Howard B. Owens in art, GCC, Roz Steiner Art Gallery

Yesterday afternoon I stopped by GCC to meet artist Dale Inglett and see the installation of his new show at the Roz Steiner Gallery. From what I could see during my short visit, the show looks like it will be visually interesting and well suited to the bright space and clean lines of the gallery.

Here's a press release from GCC about the show:

The large, clean and adaptable space of the Roz Steiner Art Gallery will host an exhibit by Alfred University Assistant Art Professor Dale Inglett, slated to open on Thursday, Nov. 15, and continuing through Jan. 3. Inglett's "Transient Beings" series includes large-scale canvasses, drawings and videos that examine both the connections and the divisions between the mind and body.

Gallery Director Shirley Tokash Verrico says the figurative images "allude to human transformation and capture a sense of transience and movement. It's an exciting opportunity to see an artist explore a unified concept through a variety of media." She notes that the artworks are an ideal fit for the new gallery which continues to draw more than 300 visitors each month.

Inglett is the recipient of a Strategic Opportunity Stipend from the New York Foundation for the Arts and has exhibited around the world, including the Neon Gallery in Brosarp, Sweden; the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens, Ga.; and Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center in Buffalo. His works in painting, printmaking and video explore aspects of identity, time and existence. He received his MFA from Studio Art, Lamar Dodd School of Art in 2004 from the University of Georgia, and his BFA from Augusta State University in 1998.

Inglett's "Transient Beings" exhibit stems from an investigation "between physiology and psychology and include the viewer in an exploration of mortality. I make figurative images that allude to human transformation and non-objective images that capture a sense of transience and movement. My studio practice centers on painting and incorporates drawing, digital media, video and, at times, printmaking."

He uses the printmaking processes to create the footage for the video "Patriarch, Matriarch," yielding both prints and video in the exhibition. The content of the video work is ephemeral and fluctuating with images dissolving and continually shifting to indicate a mutable, transformable nature of identity.

The paintings, however, build on patterns and reticulations of fluidly painted surfaces. Through the pairing of individuals with fleeting qualities in the different media, Inglett alludes to human transformation, transience and passing. While informational aspects of historical photographs are diminished, relationships and family are emphasized.

For further information about this exciting artist visit his Web site: http://www.daleinglett.com/index.html

An artist reception is scheduled at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. Mr. Inglett will also visit the Batavia campus and his exhibit on Tuesday, Dec. 11 as part of the special Encore Celebration. It will feature the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra performance for Genesee Community College Foundation's annual student scholarship fundraising gala.

The Rozalie "Roz" Steiner Art Gallery is adjacent to Genesee Center for the Arts at Genesee Community College Batavia Campus, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The gallery hours are generally Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. and during special events or by special appointment. Contact Shirley Verrico at (585) 343-0055 ext. 6490 or stvierrico@genesee.edu. The gallery Web site: www.genesee.edu/campuslife/arts/gallery/

For door-to-door driving directions visit: http://www.genesee.edu/about/visit/maps.cfm.

Monday, July 16, 2012 at 1:09 pm

Le Roy native's 'Documente' exhibit is more than just paintings

The painting above is titled "The Clash of Cultures," in it artist Tom MacPherson shows us some of the dynamics of his family history.

It's part of a new exhibit at Genesee Community College's Rosalie "Roz" Steiner Art Gallery called "Documente: The Italian American Family Album," which includes original egg-tempura portraits, old-fashioned furniture, photographs, music and stories. It will be on display through Aug. 27.

"Clash of Cultures" depicts MacPherson's two grandmothers in 1940s Le Roy. Grandma MacPherson (foreground) was a Methodist (the ribbon around her waist reads "Methodist Church of Le Roy") of Scottish ancestry, whereas Grandma O'Geen (Gugino) was Italian and Roman Catholic.

While Grandma MacPherson stands outside, Grandma O'Geen stands secure in the "bastion" of her Catholic household (behind the front door), with Swiss Guards from the Vatican guarding the entrance, St. Peter (the first Pope) standing by her side, and Pope Pius XII (upper left) keeping watch overhead.

Born in Batavia and raised in Le Roy, MacPherson now teaches studio art at SUNY Geneseo. His family history is kind of a microcosm of Le Roy's overall past.

His Scottish forebears came to Le Roy in 1801, before it even became a town.

"They were the ones who set the tone for what the local culture would be all about," MacPherson said. "And then my Sicilian relatives had to blend into that."

From the MacPhersons' immigration from the Scottish Highlands to the O'Geens' (who changed their name from Gugino to more easily fit in with American culture) immigration from Sicily in 1896, "Documente" is a detailed panorama of the artist's roots.

Included are the adventures of intrepid MacPherson aunts, elderly Italian aunts praying their Rosaries, the persecution of Italian immigrants by the Ku Klux Klan in Le Roy, and the experience of fathers and uncles in overseas wars.

Scenes re-creating household decor circa 1940-60 add three-dimensional reality, an intimate visit into the artist's everyday world at that time. 

Here in "The Pioneer," MacPherson depicts his bold, adventurous great-aunt Kitty standing on the rocks of her ancestral Scotland.

"No, I'm Not Colonel Sanders" depicts great-uncle Rossolino Barone. Like all of MacPherson's portraits, this is based on a family photograph -- in this case, of uncle "Ross" at a family wedding in the 1970s.

In the background is the drug store that he owned in the Rochester suburbs, and overhead are angels borrowed from Fillipino Lippi's "Madonna with Child and Saints."

MacPherson incorporates images from Italian Renaissance art into his portraits in order, in his words, to "infuse my relatives with their heritage."

"I wanted my Italian relatives to be able to relate to their heritage," he said. "And I wanted (the Renaissance elements) to say something about their personalities."

In the case of uncle Ross, the angels are showering roses on him for the kindness he showed other people.

Great-aunt Catherine MacPherson is the subject of "The Conversion of Great-Aunt Catherine." Catherine was an Army nurse during World War I, and she converted to Catholicism in France after seeing the bravery of the priests and nuns who took care of the wounded and dying.

She is set against the background of her ancestral home in the Scottish Highlands, and the overhead image represents her conversion (when she "saw the light").

The subject of "The Walking Dead" is MacPherson's father, Neil Lewis MacPherson. According to the written description next to the portrait, Neil came back home a "changed man" as a result of his experiences in World War II. MacPherson chose to illustrate this by appropriating the figure of death (right) from German artist Hans Baldung Grien's "The Three Ages of Death."

Here are a few other "Documente" displays:

A series of photographs in honor of MacPherson's cousin, Frank O'Geen.

"La Vita Mia"

"What Ya Gonna Do?" (a portrait of an aunt surrounded by religious icons)

"The Adventures of Great-Uncle Pete" (To view a video explaining this one, click here.)

Having explored the history of the two sides of his family in this exhibit, MacPherson is now working on a book on the subject. He hopes to have it published within the next few years.

Roz Steiner gallery is located at 1 College Road in Batavia and is open from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. Admission is free. Gallery Director Shirley Tokash Verrico always welcomes group tours (though children's groups may not be appropriate, as some of the images are more suited to adult audiences).

For more information, email Verrico at stverrico@genesee.edu or call 343-0055, ext. 6490.

Friday, March 23, 2012 at 5:38 pm

Photos: Student art show opening at Roz Steiner Art Gallery

post by Howard B. Owens in art, GCC, Roz Steiner Art Gallery

While walking by the Roz Steiner Art Gallery at GCC this afternoon, I noticed a new art show in place, so I stopped in to take a look.

It's a Fine Arts students' show that opened yesterday, and there are some very fine pieces among the sculptures, paintings and photographs.

There are two receptions for the show. The first is at 1 p.m., Thursday. The second is at 5 p.m., Friday.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 at 4:13 pm

Two artists receptions scheduled at Roz Steiner Art Gallery

post by Billie Owens in announcements, GCC, Roz Steiner Art Gallery

A diverse catalog of art projects produced by Genesee Community College Fine Arts students will be on display in the Roz Steiner Art Gallery later this month.

The display reflects coursework from painting, drawing, photography, ceramics and 2D and 3D design classes.

The exhibition runs from March 22 through April 26, with two artists' receptions to welcome the public to view the works. The opening reception is at 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 29, with a second community reception set from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 30. Many of the student artists will be present and refreshments will be served at both events.

"Teaching students how to both make and display artwork is an integral part of our mission here at GCC," says Shirley Verrico, gallery director and GCC instructor. "We are fortunate to be able to do so in a state-of-the-art gallery."

Among the projects are hand-built and wheel-thrown ceramics pieces that Fine Arts and Ceramics assistant professor Maureen "Moi" Dugan describes as a mix of various methods and approaches.

"It's awesome to see a non-art major blossom in the studio," Dugan said. "They may be hesitant when they start the class, but have a fine body of work when they leave!"

The drawings and paintings run the gamut from Impressionist to finely detailed drawings and the three-dimensional pieces focus on structural works using foam cores, mixed media and "found objects."

Fine arts and photography instructor Andrew Super says the black and white photos in the exhibit express a great range of interests and backgrounds of GCC students. Most of the photos presented are from independent projects where students are asked to look at the world around them and respond to their environment via the camera. The result is an eclectic mix of images, ranging from narratives to abstract expressions of the everyday world.

Monday, February 20, 2012 at 12:13 pm

Open call for visual art exhibitors at Roz Steiner Art Gallery

post by Billie Owens in announcements, batavia, Roz Steiner Art Gallery

Press release:

Genesee Community College announces an open call for visual art exhibitors for the Roz Steiner Art Gallery located in the Genesee Center for the Arts in Batavia. The call is open to individual artists and group exhibitions in all media interested for the 2013-14 academic year.

The mission of the Roz Steiner Art Gallery is to foster community involvement in the arts while enhancing the learning experience for all Genesee students, faculty and staff. Proposals are selected by the GCC Gallery Committee, which seeks out exhibitions that are both rich in content and quality craftsmanship.

According to Gallery Director Shirley Verrico, "The Roz Steiner Gallery serves a large audience and we need to provide that audience with meaningful experiences. Although a small percentage of our audience may pursue a career in the arts, 100 percent of our audience is asked to process visual culture every day. Learning to think creatively and critically is a skill everyone needs in the 21st Century."

The new gallery opened last spring and offers 1,700 square feet of exquisite exhibit space featuring 25-foot walls, movable island walls, bamboo flooring, and multimedia capabilities.

Interested artists and groups should complete the submission process available on the gallery website at: http://www.genesee.edu/gallery. The website also features videos and photographs of past exhibitions. The deadline for consideration for the coming academic year is May 1.

Saturday, April 16, 2011 at 2:30 pm

Hundreds turn out for opening of Rosalie 'Roz' Steiner Art Gallery at GCC

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, GCC, Roz Steiner Art Gallery, stuart steiner

The brand-new Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery opened Friday with great fanfare. Hundreds of people from throughout the county were on hand to see the gallery's first show and witness the opening ceremonies.

Above, the children and grandchildren of Roz and Stuart Steiner, from left: David Steiner, daughter Ava, Sarah Rogers, Robyn Steiner (holding Ava's hand), Lisa Rubin, Susan Steiner, Daniel Rubin and Dr. Steiner. A photo of Roz Steiner, background, was unveiled as part of the ceremony. 

Bottom photo, Eric Suritella and Carol Acquilano, the first artists featured in the gallery.

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