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Thursday, February 26, 2015 at 1:35 pm

Transcript: State of the County Speech 2015

post by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, ray cinanfrini

This is a transcript of the State of the County address delivered yesterday evening by Ray Cianfrini, chairman of the Genesee County Legislature:

One year ago, at my first State of the County Address, I indicated how the outlook for Genesee County for the Year 2014 was bright and how I believed 2014 was to be the “Year of Change.” So let’s take a look back and see what transpired:

I stated we were going to begin the process of selling the county-owned Nursing Home. We did that! We have gone through a tedious quality selection process where we submitted an RFP and received eight proposals. We are currently in the process of vetting the final two respondents to ensure a continuity of workforce and quality of care for nursing home residents. The transition of the County Nursing Home to the private sector will ensure a continued “Genesee Centric” service to our frail elderly and a quality of care at or better than the county has been providing -- with good paying jobs in coordinated care with United Memorial Medical Center. We are confident that a choice will be made soon with an expectation that the sale could be completed before the end of this year. When the sale is complete, the County’s “fiscal dark hole” will be closed -- putting an end to spending in excess of $3 million a year of taxpayer dollars to cover the annual deficits incurred in the operation of the home.

I stated that in 2014 the County was going live with our new $10.5 million 800 MHz public radio communications system. The system is now up and running with the addition of three new towers in Alabama, Bergen and Darien to increase reception. We also saw the transition to a new VHF high bank paging solution for our Fire and EMS responders. 

Tourism in Genesee County continued to be strong. Bed tax revenues last year or $443,000 generated an impressive 27% return of $93,000 on our County investment to the Chamber of Commerce of $350,000.

I noted that 2014 was the year the County Legislature was going paperless. Done! We now work off iPads without the endless flow of paper. The process is time-saving, cost-efficient, and utilizes the latest technology available for streamlining both our Committee and Legislator meetings.

Last year we hired or had elected a number of new, young, talented and energetic management employees and Legislators that I referred to as our young guns. Each is now settled into his or her role and they are on their way to becoming our next generation of County leaders. Since my address last year, as a result of retirements, the County has hired three new department heads that I can best describe as middle-aged guns, because they are not only energetic and talented, but each comes with years of experience in his or her field.

Ruth Spink, our new Director for the Office for the Aging served for years under her predecessor, Pam Whitmore. Michael Eula, our new County Historian, has a PhD in history, has published numerous historical articles in several books, and is a former long-term college professor. Jerry Ader, our new Public Defender served for many years as an assistant in the office under his predecessor, Gary Horton. Each has replaced a dedicated and long-serving department head. It is often times difficult to replace the years of experience and skill sets lost upon retirement, but we as a County are fortunate to be able to replace experience with experience and our County leadership remains strong.

On the economic front, 2014 saw some of our lowest unemployment rate in years; the unemployment rate for Genesee County in December 2014 was 5.6%, which was the lowest unemployment rate in our County for December since 2006. The rate was an historic low of 4.8% in August and September and per capita income grew in our County 6.16% in 2014. Our Job Development Bureau placed over 1,900 workers with area businesses in 2014 and we continue to have the lowest unemployment rate in the GLOW region.

Agriculture continues to be a driving force of our economy and Genesee County was in the forefront to support our local farmers with soil health workshops put on by our Soil and Water Conservation Board; the legislature also sponsored resolutions in support of Congressman Chris Collins' successful effort to kill the federal EPA Waterway Rule, which if implemented, would greatly increase the cost of doing business for farmers, if not put some of them out of business; and Genesee to college was instrumental in partnering with Genesee Valley Education Partnership to institute a new program called the Agribusiness Academy for high school seniors interested in pursuing careers in the agribusiness field.

2014 saw a concentrated focus on our County Airport for the replacement of the existing terminal and main hangar. The County advertised for bids and over 31 were received with the project bids coming in at $5.9 million (well below engineers' estimates). With $1.2 million in federal and state grants, the County issued bonds in December of last year in the amount of $4.75 million to cover the cost of the project with construction scheduled to begin in March of this year. Our airport continues to be a hub of activity with increased jet traffic from economic development and with numerous entertainment acts for Darien Lake Theme Park using the airport. With all this activity the County generated a surplus in excess of $100,000 from fuel sale receipts and T-hangar rentals.

Genesee Community College continues to give us the best bang for our buck. Last year GCC launched a new food processing technology degree program and with our County support and with significant fiscal support from the GCC Foundation, GCC is expanding with a new Student Success Center and a new Student Wellness Event Center, both scheduled for construction this year.

Economic development thrived in Genesee County in 2014 thanks to the efforts of Genesee County Economic Development Center creating a positive business climate by securing $58 million of new private capital investment including Yancey’s Fancy $20 million expansion project; A $9.8 million expansion of Liberty Pumps and Bergen and a $23 million investment in US Gypsum Company in Oakfield. It was truly noteworthy that $33 million was committed in the 2014 New York state budget for the development of our Western New York STAMP Project in the Town of Alabama. It is been said before but bears repeating that STAMP has the potential to create thousands of good-paying jobs, including thousands of long-term construction jobs, and will have a transformational impact on our economy both locally and statewide.

In last year’s address I stated that the County was heading in the right direction with many positive forces at work. I acknowledge our dedicated and hard-working staff of County employees, department heads and elected officials. With 2014 now behind us, I can look back and say with pride the hard work and dedication paid off. My expectations for success and change were accomplished. I want to take this opportunity to say thank you to my colleagues on the Legislature and to our County Manager and all our department heads for accepting change and working toward common goals that enable us to end 2014 and to begin 2015 with a balanced budget, a solid AA bond rating, (and) strong reserves in a 2015 budget that included a rare $.18 per thousand tax decrease.

If 2014 was the year of change, I see 2015 as a year of progress. With a multitude of factors at play, we, as a Legislature are again challenged to be innovative and to make more hard decisions that can have a positive effect on moving the County forward. For example, we as a Legislature have recognized that there is an imbalance in our current management salaries. Our non-management employees have the benefit of collective bargaining to address salary issues. There is no such benefit to our management personnel who are literally at the mercy of the Legislature for salary relief. Over the years, because of budget restraints, management has received little or no pay increases, which according to a study we conducted, now puts many of them at or near the bottom of a scale when compared to like employees and like positions in counties similar in size to Genesee County. The Legislature is currently engaged in an in-depth management salary review and hope to bring compensation fairness and equity to our management staff in the very near future.

As indicated earlier, work will begin this year for construction of our new airport terminal and main hangar and for expansion for Student Success Center and Wellness and Event Center at Genesee Community College. Tourism should continue to be strong in our County this year. Two new rides at Darien Lake should spur new visitors and the Chamber’s new collaborative fishing packages with Orleans County looks very promising. This year the county is looking to institute an innovative archery hunt for deer overpopulation and force management at the Genesee County Park in Bethany for four weeks from October 19 through December 15. The Park has become a safe haven for the deer during hunting season and they are feeding on shoots and seedlings threatening the viability of natural reforestation. A loss of new forest growth means a loss of future County income from the sale of timber from the Park as well as degradation of the recreation amenity and forest canopy.

The STAMP project has been recognized by the state and the Finger Lakes Region Economic Development Council is a top priority project for Western New York. Ongoing infrastructure, planning and permitting work continues and GCEDC is aggressively marketing the site in anticipation of attracting its first tenant this year. When that first tenant is on board, the $33 million in the state budget will be released for site improvements to include water, sewer and power. It’s no wonder Steve Hyde, CEO of GCEDC recently stated the “STAMP is a full-time job for many of us at GCEDC.” I firmly believe that 2015 is the year STAMP comes to life.

With the completion of the sale of our Nursing Home anticipated this year, I believe there is an urgency and a consensus among us as Legislators to leverage the proceeds from the sale to address the much-neglected condition of our 258 centerline miles of County roads and the deteriorating condition of many of our 379 county-owned bridges and culverts. Aside from the tremendous impact the sale of the Home will have on improving County finances, the sale proceeds and subsequent relief from the fiscal “dark hole” it created will allow us the opportunity to achieve both short-term and long-term improvements to our County’s infrastructure. I foresee increased annual funding and the creation of a 5-year capital reserve account dedicated solely for road and bridge repairs. We have procrastinated in this area for too long and if not addressed immediately, it is only a matter of time before public safety is compromised and our roads and bridges crumble before our eyes.

It is difficult to predict in advance how a year will unfold. Factors beyond our control can have a positive or negative impact on our best-laid plans.

For example, this brutal winter what we are experiencing is increasing our costs for fuel, salt, overtime, (and) wear and tear on our equipment. An up or down economy affects our sales tax revenues, job placements and our economic development. Heavy rain, drought or winds can adversely affect our crop production. A rising or falling female jail population affects our County Jail operating expenses.

Just as unpredictable is this State of New York. We have all too often seen how a stroke of the pen in Albany results in increased costs for Genesee County. A prime example is last year when the State unexpectedly mandated that we have to hire an additional 6 full-time correction officers and a jail supervisor at a cost to County taxpayers of over $700,000. In reviewing the Governor’s 2015 budget proposal I continue to see little or no relief for counties from the dreaded State mandates that consume 82% of our tax levy. While touting a $5.4 billion windfall, the Governor does nothing to provide property tax relief. Rather than saddle the counties with unfunded or underfunded mandates, I endorse State efforts to achieve the following: Increase access to broadband to unserved or underserved communities; facilitate NYS’s takeover of indigent defense spending over 3-5 years and relieve the counties' burden; increase the share of revenue counties retain for providing State DMV services.

Did you know under current law New York State takes 87.3% of all fees collected from work performed by county-operated DMV’s and the remaining 12.7% County share has not been increased in 14 years. This is a major inequity when the County DMV provides all the services and the State takes 87.3% of all of the revenue.

I asked the State to increase funding for probation and other alternatives to incarceration. In 2014, our Probation Department utilized its confinement option program that resulted in 848 jail days being saved, which substantially decreased our jail operating expense.

Also, I strongly implore the State to increase state investments and locally owned roads and bridges (for) reasons I previously cited. The State must cease over-regulating our IDAs and live up to its slogan that New York is open for business.

And finally, as I stated last year, the State must repeal the SAFE Act! It’s a law that makes criminals out of law-abiding citizens and is a law that we didn’t ask for and don’t want.

Time does not permit me to dwell on the scope and value of taxpayer-funded County services. Suffice it to say that we as a County are very fortunate to have a workforce dedicated to providing quality and qualified services on a daily basis. Our diverse services include public safety with our Sheriff’s office, our legal and criminal justice staffs, highway crews, (and) emergency providers: they include human services with family assistance Medicaid; child protective services, mental health and veteran services; and also in support services like information technology, our County Clerk, and our County Treasurer, Job Development, Purchasing and Planning. We as a County will continue to support education, agriculture and economic development. Our goal is to keep these services and support flowing and to deliver them in a cost-effective and improved manner.

Like last year, I’m optimistic that this year Genesee County is headed in the right direction. Last year’s changes became this year’s progress. We as Legislators must continue to move forward. Last year I challenged you to be innovative, to not be afraid of change and to be willing to make hard decisions. To your credit, you accepted my challenge. This year I offer you another challenge. If you thought 2014 was a productive year for County government, let’s make 2015 even better, let’s continue to be innovative. Let’s not be afraid to make those hard decisions in doing so, let’s be inspired by the words of Ronald Reagan who wisely stated: “There are no barriers to progress except those that we erect.”

Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at 4:33 pm

County set to auction off 23 tax-foreclosed properties

post by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, tax liens

Here's a list of the properties to be auctioned off to the highest bidder by Genesee County as part of a tax lien auction at 10 a.m., March 14, at Bontrager's on Wortendyke Road. For more on the auction, which includes City of Batavia tax foreclosures as well, visit bontragerauction.com

Address Town Type Delinquency Value
6287 Knowlesville Rd. Alabama Single family $3,037 $37,800
Bowen Rd. Alexander Vacant land $3,493 $29,000
Route 98 Alexander Vacant land $1,064 $3,400
11098 Route 98 Alexander Single family $6,342 $61,500
6859 Route 237 Byron Single family $10,247 $45,300
6371 Freeman Rd. Byron Single family $10,439 $50,000
6062 Oak Orchard Rd. Elba Mobile home $1,141 $4,000
5054 Hundredmark Rd. Elba Seasonal residence $2,851 $7,000
7150 Weatherwax Rd. Elba Single family $1,970 $5,000
7011 W. Main Rd. LeRoy Commercial $128,512 $375,000
9339 Warsaw Rd. LeRoy Mobile home $2,314 $19,500
10875 South Lake Rd. Pavilion Mobile home $9,837 $86,000
1448 Indian Falls Rd. Pembroke Single family $6,288 $83,200
8576 N. Lake Rd. Pembroke Old church residence $3,977 $30,000
Alleghany Rd. Pembroke Vacant land $3,227 $21,300
Genesee St. Pembroke Vacant land $551 $500
Clinton St. Rd. Stafford Vacant land $2,084 $2,700
6224 Route 5 Stafford Vacant land $20,309 $6,200
Spring St. Bergen Village Vacant land $1,424 $5,300
29 LeRoy St. Bergen Village Vacant land $2,084 $8,900
42 South St. LeRoy Village Single family $23,693 $77,000
19 Munson St. LeRoy Village Single family $14,769 $76,700
9266 Robbins Rd. LeRoy Village Single family $27,086 $28,000
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at 4:14 pm

Health Department asks residents to take 10-question, anonymous survey on mental health / substance abuse services

post by Billie Owens in genesee county, health

Press release:

The Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming County health departments are encouraging residents to “Think Health.” Taking time to think about your health and taking positive health steps will lead to healthier outcomes. Learning something new every day is one way to “Think Health”…

New York State relies on local health departments to promote, protect, and improve the health of their residents. Currently the Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming County health departments, in partnership with local stakeholders, are distributing a survey to assess the public’s knowledge on the existence of and accessibility (ease of access / use) of mental health and substance abuse services locally.

This effort is directly related to the 2013-2017 Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) and will serve as a baseline measurement of the area’s knowledge and/or use of these services. This priority was included in the Community Health Improvement Plan after it was found that the tri-county area has higher suicide (15.7 crude, 15.6 age adjusted) rates than the NYS average (9 crude, 8.6 age adjusted) and depression / mental health issues / and stress ranked as top concerns for the public in 2013 as well.

The survey is available online and paper. Paper surveys can be found at the health departments, as well as participating libraries, human service agencies and events throughout the tri-county area.

You can access the Community Health Survey online at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MEB2014

“Later in the year, a user-friendly online-based informational database focused on these services will be created and promoted in the tri-county area in hopes to increase awareness of what is available and make efforts to fill gaps in services locally,” said Paul Pettit, Public Health director for the Genesee and Orleans Counties health departments.

The survey can be taken by individuals living and/or working in Genesee, Orleans, and Wyoming counties. The survey is anonymous and is only 10 questions. Your honest thoughts and opinions are appreciated. All ages are encouraged to take it for themselves. If you are under the age of 18 years old, be sure to receive permission to take the survey from your parent(s) or guardian(s).

“This project is made possible through grant funds obtained from the NYS Health Foundation,” said Laura Paolucci, Public Health administrator for the Wyoming County Health Department. “This is a new territory for the public health sector and the more input from the community, the stronger the ‘building block’ of this project and those related will be.”

If you have any questions, would like to comment on the survey, and/or review the 2013-2017 Community Health Improvement Plan contact your local Health Department:

Genesee County Health Department call: 585-344-2580, ext. 5000, or visit their Web site at

www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/health/index.html

Thursday, February 12, 2015 at 11:48 am

Deputy Director Real Property Tax Services III

post by Cheryl Thorley in genesee county

Company Name

Genesee County

Job Type

Full-Time

$42,873-$47,160
For qualifications, job duties and application information: www.co.genesee.ny.us
Application Deadline: 2/27/15

Friday, January 23, 2015 at 4:53 pm

Girls' Summer Softball League Registration Opens Soon!

post by Jill Franclemont in batavia, fast pitch, genesee county, Girls, league, softball, sports, Summer

          TONAWANDA VALLEY YOUNG LADIES FAST PITCH SOFTBALL

To parents and girls aged 7-16: 

We offer an instructional/recreational program that plays fast pitch softball.   We are based in Batavia but open to any young lady in and around Genesee County.  We teach the basics of pitching, hitting, and fielding and most of our coaches are parents themselves with many years of experience.  Sportsmanship and courtesy are our prime values as we try to teach self-esteem but also team play/spirit as our ladies come from many backgrounds.  Our home field is Lions Park located on Edward Street in Batavia across from the VFW Post.  Past participants have been  teams from Elba, Byron-Bergen, Pembroke, and Oakfield  as well as some ladies from Alexander, Stafford, and Leroy.

The majority of our games are played in Batavia with a few road games within 10-20 minutes of Batavia.  Our season begins on or about Memorial Day and usually is completed by mid-July.  Our age groups, 7-9 and 10-12, will begin after Memorial Day and our age group 13-16 on or about June 5.  If a young lady is 12 and in the 7th grade it is best that she play with our 13-15 age group, since this is the modified-level age group.  Many of the modified, JV, and even varsity softball plays at all our local schools have played in our league.   We are exploring a team of participants ages 16-19 with most games being played in Bergen.

If you would like to pursue registration, please call me at 585/344-0481.  We are currently registering last year’s participants and are taking new inquiries.  Open registration will be held at the Batavia City Centre FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27:  6:00 - 8:00 P.M. and SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28:  10:30 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.   However, you can apply at this time, saving you a trip to that registration.  We have no geographic limitations for participants.

Please do not hesitate to call me with any questions about our program.

Yours in softball,

John Arent, President & Commissioner

Friday, January 23, 2015 at 1:59 pm

Deputy County treasurer resigns, new one is appointed

post by Billie Owens in genesee county

Press release from Genesee County Treasurer Scott German:

January 23, 2015

It is with very mixed feelings that I announce the resignation of James D. Stack, Deputy County Treasurer, and the appointment of Kevin J. Andrews as my next Deputy. Mr. Stack is resigning effective today to become a Monroe County Deputy Sheriff. James said becoming a deputy sheriff was a dream job of his since he was a young man. I will sincerely miss Jim, not only was he a great deputy to me, he is also a great friend. I wish Jim all the best in his new career.

Kevin J. Andrews, 26, of LeRoy, is my choice to succeed Jim as my next deputy. Andrews currently works in the Treaurer's Office as the Director of Real Property. I have worked with Kevin for four years and he has become a very valuable employee and will fit in well as Deputy Treasurer.

Kevin obtained his Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics/Statistics and Financial Economics from the University of Rochester in 2010 and has worked in the Treasurer's Office since he graduated.

Kevin and his wife, Alexandra, are expecting their first child in March.

 

Scott D. German

Genesee County Treasurer

Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 9:47 pm

Public service committee approves vehicle purchases among other items

post by Howard B. Owens in genesee county

The Genesee County Public Service Committee took the following actions today:

  • Authorized $19,663 paid to United Uniform Company for Sheriff's Office uniforms. UUC is based in Buffalo and was the sole bidder for the one-year uniform contract.
  • Approved a one-year lease for P&L Air for a flight training school at the Genesee County Airport. The lease will generate $2,475 in revenue for the county.
  • Approved the purchase of a 2016 model 4X2 International truck cab and chassis as part of a bid package by Onondaga County at a price of $89,747.
  • Approved the purchase of four Ford Focus sedans from Van Bortel Ford at a cost not to exceed $60,506.04. The vehicles will be available for various county departments.
  • In the next step toward replacing the River Street bridge over the Tonawanda Creek, approved a capital project fund in the amount of $211,000 with federal aid of $168,800 and a local match of $42,200.
  • Authorized the establishment of a capital project for safety improvements at the intersection of Pratt and Powers roads, Town of Batavia, with $628,200 of federal aid and $69,800 in local match.
Thursday, January 8, 2015 at 7:39 pm

Committee rejects bid to build solar farm on nine acres of county land

post by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, solar energy

The idea of solar power for county government certainly brought a gleam to the eye of members of the Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday, but in the end, a proposal by Solar City didn't exactly light up their lives.

The committee voted unanimously to reject a proposal that could have saved the county more than a quarter of its $500,000 annual electricity bill. 

The short-term cost savings looked good, but the long-term and potentially unknown consequences seemed daunting.

Legislator and Committee Chairman Bob Bausch worried about Solar City going bankrupt, and without some sort of bond to protect the county's financial liability, taxpayers could be left holding the bag on a nine-acre solar farm the county had no ability to maintain.

"We would have to clean up their mess," Bausch said.

County Attorney Chuck Zambito said Bausch was essentially right.

"It would be their responsibility, but if they go bankrupt, there would be no way to enforce it," Zambito said.

Legislator Maryanne Clattenburg was concerned that 20 years was too long to lock the county into technology that looks good today but may quickly become obsolete. She said she was especially concerned because the company seems so dependent on government grants, which could dry up in a few years.

"When I think of my phone 20 years ago, or I think of my computer 20 years ago -- I just think it's too long of a time to be tied into one technology," Clattenburg said.

County Highway Superintendent Tim Hens expressed concern that the state, which would help finance the project, might eventually reduce the amount of compensation the county would get for hosting the solar farm.

He also noted that the county may yet need to build a new jail and the proposed location of the farm -- nine acres off West Main Street Road, Batavia, next to County Building #2, might be a prime location for a new jail. Putting a solar farm on that land would potentially drive up the cost of a new jail if the county had to purchase nine acres elsewhere.

Solar City would get use of the nine acres to generate electricity to sell to National Grid tax free, legislators noted.

County Manager Jay Gsell said the county also looked at land at the County Airport, but found FAA regulations would prohibit any possible configuration the county could use because of glare, glide path and safety zone issues.

Hens said other companies have contacted the county about solar power and in rejecting the Solar City deal, which the county had to act on by mid-February, the county keeps its options open.

Monday, January 5, 2015 at 5:44 pm

Highway department anticipates cost savings from low gas prices

post by Howard B. Owens in genesee county

While low gas prices could mean a reduction in revenue for local governments, it could also mean significant cost savings, County Highway Superintendent Tim Hens said today.

Hens wasn't available last week when The Batavian provided an exclusive report on how falling gas prices means a reduction in sales tax revenue for local governments, but he did get back to us today about the cost side of the equation.

Hens says his best guess at this point is the county could see $75,000 to $100,000 in annual fuel spending savings.

That money will allow his department to replace aging equipment that might otherwise be deferred even longer.

Hens also anticipates a 20-percent reduction in the cost of asphalt, which would result in a cost savings of about $240,000, or rather, make it possible to buy more asphalt to cover more deteriorate roadways.

"That's a few more miles of paving that we wouldn't otherwise be able to do," Hens said. "We are about 26 miles behind on maintenance due to tight budgets and limited state and federal money, so this will let us play catch up a little bit."

Hens won't know the adjusted price of asphalt until April or May and said he's only making a guess at this point.

The county budgets $1 million for the purchase of unleaded and diesel fuel for its fleet of vehicles, which includes the highway department and Sheriff's Office.

Any savings this year would only be a one-time surplus, Hens noted.

While falling gas prices could mean people drive more, Hens said an uptick in travel would buck the trend from the past decade of falling fuel consumption. Less consumption has meant less money available from gas taxes for roadway construction and repair.

Monday, December 29, 2014 at 3:28 pm

State Comptroller asks county officials to tweak record keeping procedures

post by Howard B. Owens in genesee county

A couple of minor discrepancies were uncovered by a state audit of county records related to court and trust funds cases and the handling of abandoned property. County officials took immediate corrective actions, according to the audit report, which the Comptroller's Office completed this month.

The state's abandoned property law requires that money that has remained unclaimed with a county treasurer for three years must be turned over to the Comptroller's Office.

The audit found $507 that had not been turned over to the Comptroller's Office.

The County Clerk is responsible for recording court orders involving surplus money from foreclosures, contract disputes and mechanic's liens, and in some circumstances, funds from estates are entrusted to the treasurer for safekeeping. The County Clerk and Surrogate's Court are required to develop procedures and processes that provide a system of internal controls to account for and safeguard these funds.

The audit examined records maintained from Jan. 1, 2011 to Jan. 1, 2014.  

While records were found to be up-to-date, the Clerk's Office was not properly recording funds into a trust fund register of the money ordered paid into a court.

"The clerk's records could not be used to verify that all court-ordered deposits had been properly received and deposited by the treasurer," the audit report reads. 

The audit indicates both issues have been addressed by the Clerk's Office and the Treasurer.

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