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Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 11:23 am

GCC students to display 'Environmental Portraits of WNY' at East Bethany forest center

post by Billie Owens in announcements, east bethany, GCC

Press release:

Genesee Community College photography students will once again exhibit their work at the Genesee County Park and Forest Interpretive Center in East Bethany. Following last year's successful display, "Around the Bend: The Shared Landscape," students this year will share "Environmental Portraits of Western New York."

The show opens with a receptionfrom 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 9, at the Genesee County Park and Forest Interpretive Center, 11095 Bethany Center Road, East Bethany. Refreshments will be provided.

Photography instructor Joe Ziolkowski introduced his students this semester in both COM 105 (Intermediate Photography) and COM 118 (Introduction to Digital Photography) to portrait photography. The students, from both the main campus in Batavia and GCC's Albion Campus Center, were assigned to photograph a subject in an environment that helped illuminate that subject's life and surroundings.

The portraits reveal characters in a variety of settings. There's a farmer with cattle in a barn who appears to be doing early morning chores; a mother surrounded by the detritus of a busy day with small children; an artist pencil drawing a portrait of her own.

"Creating a portrait of a subject in its natural surroundings adds elements to their character, and therefore portrays the essence of their personality, rather than merely a likeness of their physical features," Ziolkowski said.

Students in COM 118, Introduction to Digital Photography, learn how to use the manual functions on a digital camera to control light and color. They also learn software workflow to enhance their digital files. With a digital camera, results can be seen instantly on the liquid crystal display (LCD).

"As they progress through various assignments during the course, they continue to improve on composing images in camera and reading the light available to make effective photographs," Ziolkowski said.

The COM 105, Intermediate Photography course helps students refine their photographic skills by exploring more advanced technical techniques while on location and adding studio lighting, advanced printing and camera techniques and portfolio development. Students in COM 105 have already taken COM 118 and COM 103, Introduction to Black and White Photography.

"This class combines elements of both of those classes to offer a unique experience in both analog and digital photography," Ziolkowski said.

In photography classes students learn about photographic elements, including composition, foreground/background relationship, color schemes, values, shades and contrast. They also refine the use of "Qualities of Light" such as silhouette, rim, accent, radiant, dramatic shadow, and Chiaroscuro. In addition, they exercise time management and workflow skills.

For more information about photography coursework at GCC, contact Joe Ziolkowski at (585) 343-0055, ext. 6558, or jlziolkowski@genesee.edu.

"Environmental Portraits of Western New York" will be on view through Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Interpretive Center at Genesee County Park and Forest. The Center is open from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and noon to 4 on Sundays. For more information about the center, contact Conservation Education Program Coordinator Judy Spring at (585) 344-1122 or jspring.geneseeconsed@yahoo.com

Saturday, March 8, 2014 at 6:42 pm

Lost dog finally home after running away and living several months in harsh winter conditions

"We thought she was dead. Everytime I see her I can't believe she's here," says Jason Duffy.

Duffy and his wife, Christina, brought Willow, a 3-year-old Bernese mountain dog, home to live with them Nov. 11 after picking her out at a breeder's home in Ontario County.

After only living with the Duffys for a day, Willow charged the front door as Christina opened it about 5:30 that evening. Willow then took off outside and did not respond to Christina's calls.

After about an hour, Jason Rutkowski, a neighbor, decided to help out using his ATV to check the wooded areas and fields near the Duffy home in East Bethany.

Christina and Rutkowski battled a snowstorm and cold temperatures until about 10:30 that evening without any luck.

After returning home from work that night, Duffy decided he would place an advertisement in the local Pennysaver and then blanket the area between Route 5 and Route 63 with fliers.

Three weeks went by and the Duffys finally got a lead on Willow's whereabouts.

They received a tip call from hunter Dave Hofert.  

Hofert was hunting on his property near the Batavia Party House and recognized the dog from the Pennysaver advertisment. Willow was spotted in a wooded area near an old rail bed behind the Party House.

Duffy searched the area for about a month, but there was no sign of Willow.

In mid-December he and Christina had lost hope.

With no other calls or leads, Duffy gave up and stopped calling around to local shelters and the couple decided to get another Bernese mountain dog to replace Willow.

Around Christmas, the Duffy's brought 5-month-old Shyla into their home.

The first week of February, the Duffys got a second tip call about Willow. This time from a coyote hunter who had found a den where Willow was bedding down. The den was located near the old rail bed behind the Batavia Party House close to where the first sighting had been.

Duffy immediately went to the area.

This time, Duffy was able to see Willow, but when he tried to call her she would not come to him. So every day for a week Duffy would go to her den located only a few miles from their home and feed her. Then he found a second den that she had made that was closer to the edge of the wooded area.

That's when Duffy decided to buy a live trap for $450 and set it up next to the den with some food.

"I covered it with twigs and put some raw chicken cutlet in with the dog food. The next day I knew she would be in the cage," Duffy said.

Willow has been home now for about a week and is fitting in very well with her new family.

She especially likes the leather couch and has claimed it as hers.

"She took to Shyla right away, they are like best friends," Christina says.

Duffy says, "Willow was a little skittish at first and she's still getting used to us, but she knows her name when I call her now. She has lost a little weight, but looks good. We dewormed her and gave her some antibiotics and she is good to go now."

Bernese mountain dogs are cold-weather dogs. But according to Duffy, Willow has lived in the house all of her life and has never had to fend for herself. He thinks she was living on rabbits and squirrels.

As to why she took off on Christina that snowy day in November?

Duffy thinks Willow may have been heartbroken when she was moved from the breeder's home in Ontario County. He thinks she was missing another dog she was bred with.

Married 15 years, the Duffys now have a second addition to their household.

Along with working their full-time jobs, the Duffys also run a goat farm at their home with 30 goats. The couple started the Duffy Fainting Goat Farm in 2010. The farm specializes in Myotonic and Nigerian dwarf goats. They also breed Great Pyrenees dogs.

"We love our goats and our dogs, they are part of our family," says Duffy.

(Top photo: Christina Duffy)

From left: Willow, Christina, Shyla and Jason Duffy.

Den that Willow has called home since November 2013. (Photo by Jason Duffy)

Sunday, September 8, 2013 at 1:55 pm

East Bethany man earns a living with woodworking talent

post by Daniel Crofts in art, east bethany, small business, Woodworking

Michael Bow has had a pretty good year professionally -- and, knock on wood, it will keep getting better.

Bow, 27, runs "Bow Original Woodworking" out of his home in East Bethany. He builds furniture, cabinets, and other things per client request. Clients come to him from throughout Genesee County and as far away as Massachusetts.

Here are some samples of his work:

Originally from Attica, Bow has lived in East Bethany for two years. He started his own business in October 2012, around the time his mother became ill.

"I had worked in a couple different shops," Bow said, "Then I received a lot of requests for work, and my mom got sick. It seemed like the right time to go off on my own so that I could spend more time with her without affecting anybody else."

He learned woodworking on the job as an employee of Eurostyle Woodworking in Colorado. He credits the owners, Doug Stahl and Marco Dehm, with helping him to develop the skill level he enjoys now. They were not only his employers, but also his mentors.

"They're geniuses," Bow said. "They could touch a board and make a piano."

At one point, he got to travel with Dehm to the latter's native Switzerland and get a firsthand look at his training ground.

"When I saw how the Swiss learned," Bow said, "and what 16-year-old first-year woodworking students were doing, I was humbled by how advanced they were. I know guys here (in the United States) that have done woodworking for 30 years, and there's no way they could do what the kids are doing over there."

The following interview was conducted at Bow's home:

How would you describe woodworking for the layman? How is it different from carpentry?

Woodworking is a very in-depth trade. I think that's what I love about it. You have so many different ways to do so many different things. And then you've got so many styles. There's a European style, a Japanese style -- the Japanese are phenomenal craftsmen. There's so many different ways, for example, to build a cabinet, to set a door, and to join everything. Even after 30 or 40 years you still won't know anywhere near everything about woodworking.

There are different aspects of woodworking, but it generally involves more of a finished product. To me, when someone says "I'm a carpenter," I think they're more of a framer, more of a rough builder. And that's definitely respectable. These are just two different disciplines.

Is there a typical request you get from clients in terms of what they want?

Something cheap. (laughs) My slogan is "Design & Function." People usually want something for a specific purpose. Like if it's for an entertainment center, they'll want something that can hold a flat-screen TV, space for books or a DVD player, etc. So obviously it's designed around a specific need -- that's the function in "Design & Function." You can't have one without the other. If you've got the function and there's no design to it, what good is the function? And if you've got a good design and there's no functionality to it, then what good is the design?

How do you decide what kind of wood to use for your products?

Generally, it depends on what people want. If they want a painted product, usually I'll use either soft maple or poplar. If someone is looking for a certain kind of grain, I'll offer one type of wood. If someone is on a budget, I'll offer another; cherry generally stains very well -- and it's fairly cheap. It's pretty much about what the customer is looking for. Usually when I first meet with somebody on a job I'll tell them to get on the Internet, or get a magazine, and show me what they want.

Where do you get the wood for your projects?

It depends on what work I'm getting. Usually I don't need a big quantity of wood. I go through Attica Mill most of the time. I get some specialty hardwood from someone in South Warsaw, too. And then sometimes some of the customers will have wood that has been dried, cut or milled up, and I'll take it.

How did you get started in woodworking?

(When I was a kid) my uncle, Keith Bow, was always doing something with wood. He's a genius. I always would see his work and think, "Wow!" And I admired that "wow" factor.

My dad is kind of a hobbyist; he's a good craftsman. And my brother is a woodworker down in Florida. It's just in our blood, I guess.

I think the biggest thing (I enjoy) is that "wow" factor -- especially having my dad look at something I made and say, "Wow, that's cool."

In my late high school years, when I started realizing what I wanted to do, I went that route (toward woodworking). I was fairly confident with my skills and ability and knowledge, because I have the drive.

What are some of your hopes going forward?

My hopes are to always progress, always become more efficient...basically to strive for perfection. I want to become better at what I do. I want to be able to do more unique projects and constantly do something that is "one-and-only."

I don't expect to make a million dollars a year, but I would like to get to a point where I make enough money to live well and, here and there, take a few days off to do something outside of work.

Right now I'm busy, but not swamped. It's hit and miss (from week to week). Sometimes I might be working 60 hours a week. But I love what I do -- it's an addiction.

For more information, contact bow at 409-8127 or e-mail mjbow85@gmail.com.

Sample photos courtesy of Michael Bow.

Thursday, August 1, 2013 at 1:21 pm

Three local students make the dean's list at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

post by Billie Owens in batavia, east bethany, elba, Milestones

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, located in Troy, named three local students to the Spring 2013 dean's list for academic achievement. They are:

Austin Kubiniec, of Batavia

Rosalie Mortellaro, of Elba

Tyler Murtha, of East Bethany

Rensselaer is America's oldest technological research university, offering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in architecture, engineering, information technology and Web science, management, the sciences, and the humanities, arts, and social sciences.

Thursday, June 20, 2013 at 12:19 pm

AUCTION at Mary Immaculate Parish in East Bethany

post by Richard Cilano in auction, east bethany, events

Mary Immaculate Parish invites you to a HUGE Auction on Saturday, June 22 at the Immaculate Conception Hall, 5865 Ellicott Street Road, East Bethany. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., Auction begins at 6:30 p.m. Check out some of our items by going to www.maryimmaculateny.org.

Event Date and Time

June 22, 2013 - 5:30pm - 9:00pm
Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 3:08 pm

Convicted sex offender from East Bethany pleads guilty to child porn

post by Billie Owens in crime, east bethany

Press release:

BUFFALO -- U.S. Attorney William J. Hochul Jr. announced today that Jerald Kicinski, 48, of East Bethany, pleaded guilty before U.S. Magistrate Judge Leslie G. Foschio, to receipt of child pornography. The charge carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 15 years in prison, a maximum of 40 years, a fine of $250,000, or both.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Marie P. Grisanti, who handled the case, stated that between December 2010 and December 14, 2011, the defendant received child pornography on his computer at his residence in East Bethany. These images had been transmitted to the defendant in interstate commerce via the Internet. Kicinski was previously convicted of sexual abuse in the second degree in 2002 and sexual abuse in the third degree in 1990. Both of the defendant's prior convictions involved minors.

The plea was the culmination of an investigation on the part of Special Agents of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations, under the direction of James C. Spero, special agent In charge. Sentencing will occur in front of Chief Judge William M. Skretny. No sentencing date has been scheduled.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division's Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

Sunday, March 31, 2013 at 1:00 pm

Four local students made the dean's list at Rensselaer Polytechnic University

post by Billie Owens in batavia, east bethany, elba, Milestones

Press release:

Students have been named to the dean's list at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for the Fall 2012 semester. The dean's list recognizes full-time students who maintain grade-point averages of a minimum of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 and have no grades below "C."

The following four students were granted an achievement for earning a spot on the dean's list at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute:

Austin Kubiniec, of Batavia

Robert Hoy, of Batavia

Tyler Murtha, of East Bethany

Rosalie Mortellaro, of Elba

Rensselaer is America's oldest technological research university, offering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in architecture, engineering, information technology and Web science, management, the sciences, and the humanities, arts, and social sciences. Rensselaer offers more than 145 programs at the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels.

Students are encouraged to work in interdisciplinary programs that allow them to combine scholarly work from several departments or schools. The university provides rigorous, engaging, interactive learning environments and campus-wide opportunities for leadership, collaboration and creativity.

Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 5:34 am

SUNY Geneseo names a dozen local students to its dean's list

The State University of New York at Geneseo has announced its dean's list for the fall semester 2012. To be on the list, a student must have achieved a 3.5 grade-point average while taking at least 12 credit hours.

Students on the list from this area are:

  • Chelsey Brinkman, from Alexander
  • Amanda Gouger, from Batavia
  • Christina Mortellaro, from Batavia
  • Grey Musilli, from Batavia
  • Abigayle Brown, from Batavia
  • Calli Raines, from Batavia
  • Clarisse Birkby, from Corfu
  • Sarah Lawson, from East Bethany
  • Mitchell Gillard, from Elba
  • Michael Ramsey, from Elba
  • Briana Pangrazio, from Le Roy
  • Alicia Rohan, from Oakfield

SUNY Geneseo is a public liberal arts college recognized nationally for excellence in undergraduate education and for its professional and master's level programs.

Monday, November 19, 2012 at 9:59 pm

Trespassers with flashlights reported inside Rolling Hills Asylum, East Bethany

post by Billie Owens in crime, east bethany, Rolling Hills Asylum

The owners of Rolling Hills Asylum in East Bethany called dispatch to report that an unauthorized person or persons are inside the building and a flashlight can be seen probing the darkness. Sheriff's deputies are responding. The location is 11001 E. Bethany Road in East Bethany.

Monday, August 6, 2012 at 9:21 am

GCC Spring 2012 President's List honorees

Genesee Community College proudly announces that the following students are among 540 students who were named to the President's List for the Spring 2012 semester. Students honored on the President's List have maintained full-time enrollment and earned a quality point index of 3.75 (roughly equivalent to an A) or better. (The college also maintains a Dean's List comprised of students who earn a quality point index of 3.50 to 3.74. Genesee's Dean's List will be released in the next several weeks.)

This year's Genesee Community College Spring 2012 President's List honorees, with their hometowns, are listed below:
 

Basom

Danielle Hirtzel
Jessica Pfalzer
Theresa Rainey
Elias Seward
Leah Snyder

Batavia

Russell Jackson

Bergen

Elizabeth Jarnot
Charles Lee
Lindsay Stumpf

Byron

Tiffany Harrington
Richard Lucas
Stacy Maskell
Arlene Olmstead
Adrienne Payne
Danielle Thom

Corfu

Angel Alexander
Stacy Brockway
Rachel Doktor
Tracy Kearney
Michael Kraus
Kyle Maurer
Kayla Meyer
Alyssa Reeb
Dawn Roberto
Dawn Smith
Trevor Spiotta
Dana Wolbert

Darien Center

Shannon Bates
Kylynn Bank
James Erb
Matthew Herod
Hannah Zimmermann

East Bethany

Autumn Atkinson
Julliane Ingalls
Alec Kirch
Bryce Kirch
Sarah Lawson
Janet Gohlke

East Pembroke

Anthony Nati

Elba

Michael Anauo
Nicole Beardsley
Richard Dorf
Chapin Guthrie
Chelsie Pangrazio
Samantha Walker

Le Roy

Kevin Callahan
Andi DeBellis
Eric Hayes
Stephanie Heisler
Jeanice Howard
Gregory Humphrey
Donald Kahm
Mark McAvoy
Cody Niccloy
Willard Prevost
Michele Rast
Bethany Roth
Heather Schroeder
Brenda Sheflin
Denise Simcick
Michael Sullivan
Conor Tomaszewski

Linwood

Deena Hernandez

Oakfield

Della Balduf
Jonathon Cassiano
Lindsay Chatt
Benjamin Cherry
Angela Larmon
Laura Ostrowski
Sara Read
Joseph Sullivan

Meghan Vandersteur

Pavilion

Samantha Barclay
Patricia Brown
Wendy Edwards
Kaleigh Kingsley
Jonathan White

South Byron

Halle Davalos

Stafford

Michelle Jackson

 

Genesee Community College offers over 60 academic programs and certificates, including the new Veterinary Technology (Vet Tech) and Polysomnography (Sleep Tech) programs. Genesee is accessible through seven campus locations throughout Western New York, as well as through online classes in the Distance Learning program. College housing is available at College Village, just a three minute walk from the Batavia Campus. With small class sizes yet state-of-the-art technology both inside and out of the classroom, Genesee Community College is known for being "high-tech" and "high-touch."

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