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Monday, June 16, 2014 at 5:49 pm

Law and Order: Perry woman accused of impersonating sister when arrested at Dave Matthews concert

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, byron, corfu, crime, Darien, pembroke, perry

Kaitlyn Mackenzie Hayes, 20, of Lake Street, Perry, is charged with criminal impersonation, 2nd, and trespass. Hayes allegedly impersonated her sister to reenter Darian Lake Performing Arts Center during the Dave Matthews concert Wednesday. It was later found that she allegedly used a false identification, her sister, at the time of her arrest.

Justin M. Wotherspoon, 27, of West Main Street, Batavia, is charged with criminal contempt, 1st. Wotherspoon allegedly had physical contact with a person in violation of a court order. Wotherspoon was jailed without bail.

Danielle Marie Stevens, 37, of Ford Road, Elba, is charged with grand larceny, 4th. Stevens is accused of stealing the wallet of a WIC employee who was assisting her. Stevens was jailed on $10,000 bail.

Christopher Free Bragg, 28, of Genesee Street, Corfu, is charged with petit larceny. Bragg is accused of shoplifting from Walmart. 

Richard Michael Wroblewski, 61, of Williamstowne, Cheektowaga, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 or greater and speeding (70 in a 55 mph zone). Wroblewski was stopped at 8:10 p.m. Friday on Clinton Street Road, Stafford, by Sgt. Greg Walker.

Cody James Hinchey, 27, of Reed Road, Churchville, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 or greater and speeding. Hinchey was stopped at 1:19 a.m. Saturday on Byron Holley Road by Deputy Joseph Corona.

Richard Henry Forman, 64, of Ellinwood Road, Corfu, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 or greater and failure to keep right. Forman was reportedly involved in a motor-vehicle accident at 3:01 a.m. Friday on Genesee Street, Pembroke. The accident was investigated by Deputy Joseph Corona.

Monday, June 16, 2014 at 2:25 pm

Closing ceremonies for the Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall

post by Julia Ferrini in Closing Ceremony, park, pembroke

Albion native Charles Nesbitt spoke eloquently at Sunday's closing ceremonies for the Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall at Pembroke Town Park. Nesbitt was a UH1H (Huey) helicopter pilot flying with the 57th Assault Helicopter Company in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. He served in the Armed Forces for 10 years. In addition to earning the Air Medal with 26 oak leaf clusters, he recently received the distinguished Flying Cross award for heroism. 

“When I first went to the Vietnam Wall in Washington (D.C.) and walked down the ramp it felt like the wall was engulfing me,” Nesbitt said. “It felt as though it was going to crush me.”

The names on the Cost of Freedom Wall aren’t just names. They are fathers and brothers, mothers and sisters. Every single one of them laid down their life, giving the ultimate sacrifice for their fellow man. Every one of those names, forever etched in stone, belonged to a person, a comrade, a friend. 

Regardless of party affiliation or beliefs, these men and women are recognized and honored as heroes for these United States of America.

Sunday, June 15, 2014 at 10:05 am

Remembering fallen firefighters

post by Julia Ferrini in Cost of Freedom, firefighters, pembroke

Firefighters who have fallen in the line of duty were honored Saturday at Pembroke Town Park as part of the four-day Cost of Freedom event held in Pembroke. Genesee County Fire Coordinator Timothy Yaeger applauded those men and women of courage who give unselfishly in aid of others and remembered those who have lost their lives.

Good, reliable firefighting equipment is of course essential. And there are times when that equipment has just as much of a story to tell as those who fight the fires. In this case, it is South Byron’s Rescue 88 vehicle.

“Rescue 88 was just about brand new with the Floral Park Fire Department in Long Island,” Scott Blossom said. “This vehicle was there, on that day, at ground zero.”

The Long Island Fire Department was retiring this truck out of service when South Byron Fire Department was looking to add an ambulance to its inventory.

“This truck was donated. All we had to do was go pick it up,” the Assistant Chief of South Byron Fire Department said. 

Not only did this truck serve New York City on Sept. 11, 2001, this vehicle was also used to bring a life into the world.

“Floral Park (Fire Department) has this neat tradition. They place a stork sticker, with a pink or blue blanket, on their rescue vehicle if a child was born in the ambulance,” Blossom said. “I often wonder how long after 9/11 that baby girl was born in this vehicle.

“Oftentimes, ambulances are on a scene because someone has left this world,” Blossom continued. “I thought it was neat that this one was also used to bring someone into this world.”

In addition to the stork emblem, the ambulance also has an insignia of the badge of one of the Floral Park paramedics who lost his life Sept. 11.

“We’ve had this ambulance for about four or five years now. She’s finally coming up on 50,000 miles,” Blossom said. “She’s a special girl for us.”

Sunday, June 15, 2014 at 10:00 am

Remembering Fallen Police Officers

post by Julia Ferrini in pembroke, police

Ceremonies were held Friday to honor those police officers who have died in the line of duty. Representatives from the state and county were on hand to give tribute to their fallen comrades at Pembroke Town Park.

Friday, June 13, 2014 at 7:35 pm

Opening ceremonies for Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall were 'awesome'

post by Julia Ferrini in American Legion Post 626, Memorial, pembroke, veterans

Monetary value cannot be placed on the cost of freedom. It has been, and continues to be, paid with the blood, sweat and tears of a nation’s people. 

Opening ceremonies for the Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall were held Thursday at Pembroke Town Park. Kicking off the day’s events was Bobbie Metcalf’s stirring rendition of the National Anthem. Then retired Army Brigadier General Frank Cipolla spoke briefly of the number of men and women who have lost their lives during times of war. He further spoke of the strength of Americans.

While the Vietnam Memorial Traveling Wall had made an appearance in Western New York in 2010, the Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall is making its first debut in the area. This monument commemorates every veteran that has fought and died in battle from the Revolutionary War up to and including the war in Afghanistan. 

“This wall commemorates every veteran (who) has fought and died for our freedom,” said Timothy Burch, a member of the Oakfield-Alabama American Legion Post #626. “Including firefighters, policemen and first responders of 9/11.”

The memorial spans the length of almost two football fields, resembling the Wall in Washington, D.C.. A permanent monument, donated by Galley Monuments, Batavia, has been set at the site as tribute to fallen soldiers. In addition, the American Legion opened a contest to local schools and asked the question, "What does the cost of freedom mean to you?". Of those who participated, Abby Shaw, of Pembroke, won the contest and her poem titled "The Cost of Freedom" is inscribed on one side of the stone. 

“I’m very excited to be a part of this event,” Burch said. “I joined the Legion almost a year ago and I fell into this face-first. I wanted to be involved. I have an emotional attachment to those who have volunteered to serve during wartime. Both my grandfathers served, as well as my father.”

“So many people from the community are involved in this,” said Joe Joyce, vice commander of Post 626. “It’s amazing.”

According to Joyce, bringing the memorial to the area was almost two years in the making. Donations and fundraisers were held to generate enough capital to make it happen.

“Not one person turned me down when we (the Legion) asked for a donation,” Joyce said. “The response from the community was outstanding.”

“This display will educate people to really show what the cost of freedom is,” Burch said, “and shows how many people sacrificed their lives so that we remain a free country.

“My uncle’s name is on this wall. He died in Korea,” Burch continued. “My service was insignificant by way of comparison to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. They should be honored every day.”

According to the American Veterans Traveling Tribute -- the organization whose mission is to bring the Cost of Freedom Tribute and The Traveling Wall to as many communities as possible -- this event is the first to hold separate days to honor each service area.

“We are setting a precedence for the wall. We are making history with this event,” Burch said.

Alan Myers, a World War II veteran, said, “It’s awesome, isn’t that what the young people say, really emotional, to be involved in this event. It makes people aware of just what the military goes through.”

Myers, who served three years with the 13th Defense Atlantic Fleet, led the motorcade Wednesday with his quarter-ton World War II jeep. According to Myers, the jeep he was driving came off the line the day Pearl Harbor was attacked and was also used during the war. 

In addition to the memorial, displays throughout the grounds include a tribute to the attack on the Twin Towers, as well as, information on each branch of the military and police and firefighters. The four-day event itself is free, however, donations will be accepted to help defray the cost of bringing the wall to the area.

“When you listen to our National Anthem, I mean really listen,” Burch said. “It was written during the Revolutionary War during after a long battle. Francis Scott Key was simply writing about what he was seeing at that time (the bombarding of the American forces at Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore on the night of Sept. 13–14, 1814). That’s war. That’s the cost of freedom.”

http://www.zenfolio.com/zf/tools/slideshow.aspx?id=18989488

Friday, June 13, 2014 at 7:59 am

Duty. Honor. Sacrifice

post by Julia Ferrini in Memorial, pembroke, Post 626, veterans
Friday, June 13, 2014 at 7:59 am

Duty. Honor. Sacrifice

post by Julia Ferrini in Memorial, pembroke, Post 626, veterans

Monetary value can not be placed on the cost of freedom. It has been, and continues to be, paid with the blood, sweat and tears of a nation’s people. 

Opening ceremonies for the Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall were held Thursday at Pembroke Town Park. Kicking off the day’s events was Bobbie Metcalf’s stirring rendition of the National Anthem. Following, Brigadier General Frank Cipolla spoke briefly of the number of men and women who have lost their lives during times of war. He further spoke of the strength of the American people.

While the Vietnam Memorial Traveling Wall had made an appearance in Western New York in 2010, the Cost of Freedom Memorial Wall is making its first debut in the area. This monument commemorates every veteran that has fought and died in battle from the Revolutionary War up to and including the war in Afghanistan. 

“This wall commemorates every veteran that has fought and died for our freedom,” Timothy Burch said. “Including firefighters, policemen and first responders of 9/11.”

The memorial spans the length of almost two football fields, resembling the Wall in Washington D.C..  A permanent monument, donated by Galley Monuments, Batavia, has been set at the site as tribute to fallen soldiers. Furthermore, the American Legion opened a contest to local schools and asked the question, ‘What does the cost of freedom mean to you?’. Of those who participated, Abby Shaw, of Pembroke, won the contest and her poem titled ‘The Cost of Freedom’, is inscribed on one side of the stone. 

“I’m very excited to be a part of this event,” said Burch, a member of the Oakfield-Alabama American Legion Post 626 . “I joined the Legion almost a year ago and I fell into this face-first. I wanted to be involved. I have an emotional attachment to those who have volunteered to serve during wartime. Both my grandfathers served, as well as my father.”

“So many people from the community are involved in this,” said Joe Joyce, Vice Commander of Post 626. “It’s amazing”

According to Joyce, bringing the memorial to the area was almost two years in the making. Donations and fundraisers were held to generate enough capital to secure a date for the memorial.

“Not one person turned me down when we (the Legion) asked for a donation,” Joyce said. “The response from the community was outstanding.”

“This display will educate people to really show what the cost of freedom is,” Burch said, “and shows how many people sacrificed their lives so that we remain a free country.

“My Uncle’s name is on this wall. He died in Korea,” Burch continued. “My service was insignificant by way of comparison to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. They should be honored every day.”

According to the American Veterans Traveling Tribute, the organization whose mission is to bring the Cost of Freedom Tribute and The Traveling Wall to as many communities as possible, this event is the first to hold separate days to honor each service area.

 “We are setting a precedence for the wall. We are making history with this event,” Burch said.

Alan Myers, a WWII veteran, said, “It’s awesome, isn’t that what the young people say, really emotional, to be involved in this event. It makes people aware of just what the military goes through.”

Myers, who served three years with the 13th Defense Atlantic Fleet, led the motorcade Wednesday with his quarter-ton WWII jeep. According to Myers, the jeep he was driving came off the line the day Pearl Harbor was attacked and was also used during the war. 

In addition to the memorial, displays throughout the grounds include a tribute to the attack on the Twin Towers, as well as, information on each branch of the military and police and firefighters. The four-day event itself is free, however, donations will be accepted to help defray the cost of bringing the wall to the area. Closing ceremonies will be held Sunday starting at 1 p.m..

“When you listen to our National Anthem, I mean really listen,” Burch said. “It was written during the Revolutionary war during a long battle. Francis Scott Key was simply writing about what he was seeing at that time. That’s war. That’s the cost of freedom.”

 

Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 1:13 pm

Photos: Black bear on Lake Road, Pembroke

post by Howard B. Owens in animals, bears, pembroke

David Thuerck submitted these photos of a black bear he spotted on Lake Road, Pembroke.

 

Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 9:39 am

Photos: Vietnam Moving Wall escorted from Batavia to Pembroke

A motorcade of several motorcycle organizations, as well as, state, county and local police, firefighters and first responders, escorted the Vietnam Moving Wall from Batavia to Pembroke Wednesday morning.

The 17-mile trek was spotted with patriots waving flags and holding signs.

Upon reaching the town park in Pembroke, veterans and supporters who participated in the escort held a brief, solemn ceremony to commerate the wall's arrival.

The effort to bring the moving wall back to Genesee County for another visit was spearheaded by members of the Oakfield-Alabama American Legion Post 626, with support of area community members.

A dedication ceremony at the park begins today at 11 a.m. For more information, click here.

Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 12:06 am

Vietnam Moving Wall arrives in Genesee County

post by Howard B. Owens in Oakfield, pembroke, veterans

The Vietnam Moving Wall returned to Genesee County today and was transported in with an honor escort from Batavia to Pembroke this morning.

The wall will be on display as part of the Cost of Freedom Tribute sponsored by Oakfield-Alabama Legion Post #626 at Pembroke Town Park through Sunday.

For a schedule of events, click here.

These four photos were taken in Oakfield this morning.

We have more photos and coverage coming.

Mel Osborn placed flags in front of his residence in Oakfield in anticipation of the escort passing through the village.

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