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Howard B. Owens's blog

Friday, August 15, 2014 at 10:21 am

Law and Order: Traffic stop in Corfu yields drug-related arrest

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, corfu, crime, Darien, Stafford

John E. Sackett, 48, of 81 Falmouth St, Rochester, is charged with aggravated unlicensed operation, 2nd, unlawful possession of marijuana, and criminal possession of a controlled substance, 7th. Sackett was stopped for allegedly speeding in the Village of Corfu by Officer Mike Petritz. Sackett was allegedly going 48 in a 35-mph zone and found to have 16 suspensions on his license. He was allegedly found with a small quantity of marijuana and a small baggie containing cocaine residue. Sackett was jailed on $1,000 bail or $1,000 bond.

Thomas James Rose, 18, of Ford Road, Elba, is charged with driving while impaired by drugs and unlawful possession of marijuana. Rose was arrested following an investigation into a personal injury accident off a driveway on Valle Drive, Batavia, at 6:45 p.m. Aug. 3. The accident was investigated by Deputy James Diehl.

William Leslie Casinett II, 32, of Frontier Avenue, Niagara Falls, is charged with assault, 3rd. Casinett allegedly punched another person in the face causing physical injury at 9:30 p.m. July 29 while at the Darien Lakes Performing Arts Center.

Kirk Andrew Frye, 25, of South Swan Street, Batavia, is charged with petit larceny. Frye is accused of shoplifting at Walmart.

Kevin Albert Roberts, 23, of Riverstone Parkway, Canton, Ga., was arrested on warrants alleging criminal mischief, 3rd, petit larceny and unlawful possession of marijuana. Roberts was arrested in Georgia as a fugitive from justice and returned to Genesee County. He was arraigned in Town of Batavia Court and jailed without bail.

Stephen K. Mullen, 25, of Silver Springs, is charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. Mullen was stopped by State Police at 2 a.m. Aug. 5 on Route 5, Stafford. No further details released.

Jacob R. Reinhardt, 51, of Corfu, is charged with DWI and driving with a BAC of .08 or greater. Reinhardt was stopped by State Police on Colby Road, Darien, at 10:36 a.m. Wednesday.

Steven P. Tubinis, 42, of Niagara Falls, is charged with felony DWI and felony driving with a BAC of .08 or greater. Tubinis was stopped at 10:15 p.m. Wednesday on Colby Road, Darien, by State Police.

Friday, August 15, 2014 at 9:50 am

Diner in Village of Corfu moving to new location near Pembroke High School

post by Howard B. Owens in business, corfu, pembroke

Linda's Diner in the Village of Corfu is moving.

The Genesee County Planning Board approved a proposal submitted by Pembroke resident Linda Richley to convert a single-family residence at 8783 Allegheny Road into a restaurant.

The location is just south of Pembroke High School.

The new Linda's Diner will be build inside a 1,176-square-foot, ranch-style home built in 1959.

Richley said this morning that it was her son and daughter who encouraged her to move.

The location is strategically located near the busy intersection of routes 5 and 77, close to Yancey's Fancy cheese shop and Pembroke HS, Richley said.

Her daughter would like to eventually add ice cream to the menu and her son already operates a BBQ catering business, so the location would give him a place to set up and cook pulled pork and ribs when he isn't at a client's location.

"It's more their idea than mine," Richley said, but she is looking forward to the family owning its own location after renting for all these years.

The plans approved by the planning board call for 25 parking spaces on the lot.

Richley purchased the 1.1-acre parcel from the Town of Pembroke, which acquired it when they bought lland for the town park.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 10:50 pm

You could win $100 if you wear your Batavian T-shirt to Summer in the City

post by Howard B. Owens in advertisement, Sponsored Post, thebatavian

This Saturday is Summer in the City. I'll be there for at least some of the event walking around and taking pictures.

I'm going to be looking for people wearing T-shirts that say "The Batavian" on them.

We've sold a couple hundred shirts over the years.

The seventh person I spot wearing their The Batavian T-shirt will get a $100 bill.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 3:15 pm

New owners, employees, community leaders celebrate the saving of a Batavia institution

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, p.w. minor

The employees are happy. Local officials are happy. Pete and Andy are happy. Everybody's happy.

Even the costume designers for the hit HBO series Empire Boardwalk are happy (at least we assume so -- they'll still be able to order p.w. minor shoes for the show).

A Batavia institution, along with 70 local jobs were saved by two local businessmen. Today, speaker after speaker praised Pete Zeliff and Andrew Young for stepping forward just a month ago when they heard the 150-year-old shoe company was closing to buy it and keep it going.

Zeliff and Young plan to do more than just keep the doors open. They vow to expand the business and create more jobs in Batavia.

"The struggles of this company are over," Young said. "We're going to make it work, OK. Once again, we'll make this company the epitome of 'Made in America.' "

They've gotten some help from Empire State Development to help make the purchase possible.

Regional Director Vincent Esposito announced ESD is making available $450,000 from the agency's Excelsior Jobs Program. To qualify, Zeliff and Young had to pledge to create jobs and make a significant capital investment in the company.

Young and Zeliff were also planning to apply for $269,000 in tax abatements from the Geness County Economic Development Center, but that application was tabled Monday on the advice of the agency's attorney.

The attorney is researching the matter further, according to Ray Cianfrini, chair of the Legislature as well as a GCEDC board member. But it appears that so long as Zeliff is a member of GCEDC board, p.w. minor can't receive assistance from GCEDC.

Zeliff has a big decision to make -- resign from the board and apply for the tax relief, or stay on the board and move p.w. minor forward without any further tax breaks.

Zeliff said he's made no decision yet and offered little insight into his thought process on the matter. He did note that serving on the GCEDC board is a volunteer position. Directors are not paid.

Former GCEDC Board Chairman Charlie Cook, CEO of Liberty Pumps, resigned from the board when it came time for his company to expand and Liberty applied for assistance from GCEDC.

Today, Cianfrini spoke at the press conference -- really a celebration -- at p.w. minor's facility on Treadeasy Way.

"Today is not only a great day for p.w. minor and all of its employees," Cianfrini said. "It's a great day for all of Genesee County. We need to recognize how fortunate we are to have people like Pete Zeliff and Andy Young, who are dedicated to economic development, here in Genesee County, who are willing to get personally involved in economic development."

City Councilman John Canale recalled touring the p.w. minor factory on State Street when he was a child, and talked about how he grew up with the company being an ever-present part of the community his entire life.

"p.w. minor is an icon," Canale said. "It's a Batavia institution. When I found out that institution would no longer be in business, I felt like I had just read the obituary of someone that I knew and loved in this community. Today makes it a very happy day, in that two guys with a bit of ambition and a whole lot of entrepreneurial spirit decided this institution needs to continue in this community."

After the speeches, attendees were invited on guided tours of the plant to see how shoes are made in Batavia.

A few lucky people even got to see the shoe sent to the costume designers of Boardwalk Empire.

With media around, a couple of employees demurred at being interviewed, and at one point, as a worker was surrounded by photographers, Young asked her, "are you mad at me (for bringing the media over)?" Another employee nearby spoke up, "How could we ever be mad at you? You saved us."

The average p.w. minor employee has been with company 24 years.  

Andrew Young and Pete Zeliff.

The style of shoe sent to the set of Boardwalk Empire.

UPDATE: After the jump, a press release from Gov. Cuomo.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 1:27 pm

Photos: Kiss rocks Darien Lake

The rock band KISS played Darien Lake Performing Arts Center on Wednesday, and photographer Amanda Earl was there to get some pictures for us.

The Sheriff's Office reported no arrests during the concert.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 10:40 am

Developer discusses pulling plug on senior housing project after GCEDC board blocks public funding

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Calamar, GCEDC, senior housing

A company that was planning to build much needed middle-income senior housing in Genesee County is apparently ready to kill the project after the Genesee County Economic Development Center Board voted Tuesday to block the project from receiving financial aid.

A representative of Calamar, the senior housing developer, sent an e-mail to a county official yesterday that said without the more than $1.4 million in tax breaks Calamar was seeking, the project is not financially viable. 

A source provided The Batavian with a copy of the e-mail.

"We've been left with no options than to not proceed," wrote Jocelyn Bos, director of senior housing development for Calamar. "If we do not have an endorsement, I wouldn't be able to keep the rents affordable to the middle income senior group of Batavia." 

Asked by The Batavian for further comment and to confirm the contents of the e-mail, Bos backed off the not-proceeding statement.

Her entire statement:

First, I want to tell you how I have admired how your paper supports the seniors of all incomes in your community and just want to let you know that we are exploring our options regarding our proposed middle-income senior complex.

According to John Gerace, a real estate agent who assisted Calamar with locating the property on West Main Street Road for the project, Calamar officials spent much of yesterday discussing their options.

Among them, he said, is filing an Article 78 claim (essentially a lawsuit) against GCEDC.

The way Gerace sees it, middle-income housing for seniors is needed in Batavia; it's part of the county's master plan; it's an identified need in GCEDC's planning documents; and this is a commercial project just like any other, so it's eligible for assistance.

"I told them (the GCEDC board), 'you guys should be ashamed of yourselves because you know it's warranted and needed, so what you've done is just shut the door on any more senior housing in Genesee County,' " Gerace said.

Calamar was seeking $400,000 in sales tax and mortgage tax exemption and a $1 million PILOT, which exempts a property from additional property taxes on an increase in assessed value, graduated over 10 years.

The value of the developed property would have been at least $5 million, Gerace said, which would have meant an additional $175,000 in new local property tax revenue once the PILOT expired. 

Local residents selling their homes to move into the Calamar facility also would have generated new tax revenue, Gerace said.

Gerace worked as a secondary agent on the property sale, he said, and stood to get no more than a $4,000 commission on the $1 million sale of the property on West Main Street Road.

Ray Cianfrini, chairman of the County Legislature, and a GCEDC board member, said he voted against Calamar because he can't see authorizing spending $1.4 million in taxpayer money to create two jobs.

"We all agreed that it's a worthwhile project," Cianfrini said. "We all agree middle-income senior housing is needed. We agree with that, we just don't want to spend taxpayer money to do it. If the project doesn't go forward, I feel badly about that, but this was not a narrow vote."

Cianfrini said he also sees the Calamar project as competition for existing senior housing in the county -- housing that was built without taxpayer assistance.

Calamar would have been able to charge lower rents than some existing projects and that wouldn't be fair to the other developers, Cianfrini said.

The idea of competition is the key to the vote, Gerace said. More new housing in the county would mean more competition for Pete Zeliff and his Oakwood Estates project on the east side of town.

Zeliff, a newer member of the GCEDC board, is building single-family homes that would be marketed to upper-income professionals.

Gerace thinks that creates a conflict of interest for Zeliff and Cianfrini, who is the attorney for Zeliff on the project.

Cianfrini and Zeliff said both said don't see a conflict of interest. The two projects are completely different. They're aimed at different markets -- one is rental, the other is home ownership. Even if you factor in existing homes being vacated by seniors moving into the Calamar project, that's still a very different home buyer looking at those older homes than would consider something in Oakwood Estates.

Zeliff has not even approached the GCEDC about financial incentives for Oakwood Estates. He said his vote against the Calamar project had everything to do with the merits of the proposal.

"They're creating just two jobs at cost of $1.4 million," Zeliff said. "That's $700,000 a job. The residents complain when the EDC gives incentives to industry that is $100,000 a job, why would the residents want to commit $700,000 to a job to residential housing?"

And yes, competition is an issue -- Calamar would compete with projects such as Clinton Crossings, which charges $1,100 a month in rent. Calamar's taxpayer-subsidized rents would all be $1,000 or less.

Clinton Crossings received no tax incentives for its project, Zeliff said.

"They have 35 people on the waiting list waiting to get in," Zeliff said. "The area will support senior housing at the money Calamar claims it won't."

Gerace wonders why the GCEDC board wouldn't even let the project go to a public hearing, allowing the public to weigh in on whether Calamar should get tax incentives to help build much needed senior housing.

Cianfrini said he didn't see any point in a public hearing.

"My position, if we don't believe in the project in the first instance, why let it go to a public hearing when we know we're going to vote it down after a public hearing," Cianfrini said. "We just thought we'd be wasting valuable time to even let it go to a public hearing. If they want to know what the public viewpoint on this is, let them poll the public themselves and get their own opinion on it."

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 9:36 am

Jerry Ader selected as new public defender

post by Howard B. Owens in public defender

Jerry Ader, pictured yesterday during a committee of the whole meeting of the Genesee County Legislature, has been named the new public defender.

Ader, a longtime assistant to the former PD, Gary Horton, was the name the selection committee kept coming back to as it waded through the candidates, said Legislature Chairman Ray Cianfrini. He was the most qualified and with a proven track record of dedication to the job.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 9:31 am

Mud races in East Pembroke this Sunday

post by Howard B. Owens in east pembroke, mud races, sports

The East Pembroke Mud Races are on a Sunday this year -- this Sunday.

Registration starts at 10 a.m. The first race is 12:30 p.m.

Registration fees: $15 per class, $5 for 11 and under, $5 for each additional class and racers still pay admission. 

Admission is $10, with 11 and under free. Pit admission is $12.

You can enter a raffle to win the four-wheeler shown above. 

Pictured with the 2014 Cao Polaris 570cc are James Gayton and Dale Lewter.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 9:20 am

UPDATED: Byron couple looking for missing cat, Zoe

post by Howard B. Owens in animals, byron, pets

Stefanie and Kevin are hoping you can help them find Zoe. She's been missing for a week now. This is an older picture. She's put on a little weight since it was taken. Her home is in the Byron area. If you've seen Zoe or have Zoe, call (585) 548-9961.

UPDATE Aug. 15: Zoe is home safe and sound, according to her very happy owners, Stefanie and Kevin!

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 9:14 am

Street closures for Summer in the City on Saturday

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, BID, downtown, Summer in the City

Summer in the City is Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Here's the notice of streat closures for the day:

Streets closed (barricades) at 7:30 a.m.:  Main, Bank, Center, School, Jackson, Court & Jefferson:

Bank at Washington (For Race Only)
Bank at Alva
Main at Upton Monument
Main at Liberty / Summit
Jackson at Ellicott
Center at School
Court at Ellicott  / Parking Lot Entrances /Bank Drive-Thru
Jefferson at Intersection Tonawanda Valley & Wendy’s Parking Lots
Wendy’s -- Main Street Entrance

Main Stage: Will be located in front of Wendy’s / County Building #1 on Main Street facing east. Entertainment begins at 11 a.m. and ends at 9 p.m.

Vendors: Crafters and nonprofits & KidsZone located on Main, Court & Jefferson. Food vendors will be on the north side of Main Street from in front of Larry’s Steakhouse, west to corner of Main & Jefferson. Commercial vendors on the south side of Main Street from corner of Court to Center Street. BID Businesses south side from Jackson to Center Street.

Super Cruise: Vehicles will be on the north side of Main Street from Jackson Street, east to Liberty / Summit, and the south side from Center to Liberty Street. They will also be on Jackson, School & Center streets and a segment of Bank Street.

Donny Carroll 5K Race: Start/ Finish line will be at the entrance of Bank of America Drive-Thru.  The race starts at 9 a.m. and ends finishes by 10:30 a.m.

Access To Parking Lots:  Court / Jackson access off of Ellicott Street;
                                            Alva access off of Alva Place & Bank Street (after 5K Race
                                            ends at 10:30 a.m.);
                                           Center Street access off of School Street

Reopen streets at 11 p.m.

Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 9:09 am

Keeping customers coming back has helped Southside Deli thrive for 25 years

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, Ellicott Street, Southside Deli

Standing by a window, toasting a French bread pizza, Jeff Heubusch looked out on sunny Ellicott Street and mused, "sure beats working working in a salt mine."

He then states the obvious with a wry smile. "There's no windows in a mine shaft."

Heubusch should know. He spent 12 years working in a salt mine. He only quit when a mining accident nearly took his life.

His year-long recuperation gave him time to reflect and reassess what he wanted to do with his life.

The son of a miner, Heubusch purchased Southside Deli two years before the accident (today is the 25th anniversary of that purchase). He kept his mining job even as he tried to build the deli business. Digging out the salt of the Earth so motorists could drive on de-iced asphalt offered Heubusch a sense of security not available to entrepreneurs. He didn't want to give up that steady paycheck and good benefits while trying to build a business of his own.

While convalescing, Heubusch said to himself, "Am I going to lay on this couch the rest of my life and live on comp or Social Security disability?"

"Once I was able to get around and be productive, that's when I said, really, 'it's all or nothing.' "

That sense of commitment has stuck with Heubusch now for more than two decades. It's the reason Southside Deli not only survived. It thrived.

One hundred customers a day has become 500. Three employees have become 17. Children who once bought pop and candy at the store now bring their families in for subs and salads.

Born in Wyoming County, Heubusch graduated from Warsaw High School in 1977. He was 17 and couldn't get a job, so he went to work in his mother's upholstery business.

When he turned 18, he got his first job in a salt mine.

He was laid off, rehired, laid off and rehired again a couple of times over the next few years. During that time he also worked for U.S. Gypsum and Le Roy Machine.

He bought a house in Batavia, and when he started working in the mine again, his daily commute took him down Ellicott Street.

Every day, he would drive past Southside Deli (Heubusch kept the name from the previous owner; In the 19th Century, it was Ebling Meat Market and the location has always been some sort of market). 

On the second floor of the building is a balcony. As he drove by each day, Heubusch would see a for sale sign hanging from the balcony rail.

That got his mind working.

"I'd see it and I'd think to myself, 'man, I'd love to work for myself.' I kept seeing that and it kept fueling my idea of what I would do if I owned that."

There's a reason working in a salt mine is a metaphor in our culture's lexicon for arduous work. It's hard labor.

In flush times, Heubusch worked 10 to 12-hour days, seven days a week.

"There were days I never saw daylight."

One day, finally, he called a realtor and got the ball rolling.

Escrow closed Aug. 10, 1989. Heubusch opened Southside Deli for the first time under his ownership four days later.

The business needed a lot of work, he said. The century-old building needed an array of repairs. There was kitchen equipment to replace and Heubusch wanted to expand the deli.

"I knew the deli had potential. It was a great concept, but he (the previous owner) wasn't a hands-on guy. I knew if I worked it, I could bring it to life."

There was nothing easy about those early years, said Heubusch, who had no prior food service experience.

Besides keeping his job in the salt mine, Heubusch and his family (his daughter Cassandra was 4 years old at the time) lived in the apartment above the store.

"That's the only way I could do it."

Cassandra rode her skates through the aisles and learned to ring out deli customers by the time she was 6.

Then came the mining accident.

He was at the bottom of a mine shaft and it closed up on him. Heubusch suffered a pair of broke legs, a broken back and nerve damage.

"To me, it was a life-threatening experience. It all could have ended that day."

He required multiple surgeries, a year of at-home convalescence, seven years of physical therapy and 20 years of chiropractors.

To see him work in his store today, you would never guess his body had been through such trauma. 

"This place did help me, both mentally and physically."

So what's the secret to his success?

Heubusch said it's easy: hard work, good food and a singular focus on keeping customers happy.

A customer complaint feels like a failure, Heubusch said.

He takes a lot of pride in how well his deli team works together to take orders quickly, move fast and deliver the right sub or wrap made well and with alacrity. It's timing and attention to detail.

"I like being known as the place with the best subs. The best meats, the best salads. That's our niche. People can go anywhere else and buy pop, groceries or beer, but you can't buy a Southside Deli sub anywhere else. If you've been raised on Southside, nobody can match it."

The best measure of success, Heubusch said, is the customer who comes back.

"It's a good feeling. When you have a customer who's never been in before and they come back and they come back and they come back, it's a good feeling. Then I know I'm doing the right thing."

It sure beats working in a salt mine.

During lunch hour, customers are often lined up four and five deep at the deli counter.

On the wall above the racks of candy are 22 pictures of Little League teams sponsored by Southside Deli. Heubusch said young men come in now and point to pictures of their 8- and 9-year-old selves.

"It sure beats working in a salt mine."

A big part of Southside's lunch business comes from workers calling in their orders for pick up.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 11:05 am

Lieutenant governor candidate tells local residents he supports ag, is against the SAFE Act and Common Core

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, agriculture, Chris Moss, Rob Astorino

Chris Moss, running for lieutenant governor, made three campaign stops in Genesee County on Tuesday, starting with Batavia Turf Farms, where he got a look at a natural roof covering that Batavia Turf/CY Farms grows for a company in France, Vegitel.

In the photo above, Moss, in the dark suit on the left, talks with local farmers while standing on flats filled with sedum plants.

Craig Yunker, CEO of CY Farms, explained that rooftops covered in Sedum absorb more water, preventing runoff, and help cool the building more efficiently.  

"They (Vegitel) supply green roofs to buildings looking to help control stormwater, help reduce energy costs and reduce the hotspots in cities," Yunkers said.

After the briefing on sedium-covered roofs, area farmers shared some of their issues with the state, particularly in the area of farm labor and a renewed effort by New York City activists to raise wages beyond what would be sustainable for Upstate farmers.

Moss said he and his running mate, gubernatorial candidate Rob Astorino, fully support New York's agriculture industry.

"We understand the importance of farming and what it does for New York State, the importance to the economy," Moss said.

The discussion then turned, led primarily by Rep. Chris Collins, to how folks such as Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver are holding back the New York economy with taxes and regulations.

Collins hit on themes he would return to when he and Moss appeared later at the Genesee County Women's Republican Club event at Batavia Downs and the Genesee County SCOPE meeting at the Calvary Baptist Church on Galloway Road, Batavia.

Collins said "New York is losing." People are moving away. Businesses are moving away. There was a time when New York had 45 members of Congress and Florida had seven. Now, New York has 27 and Florida has 29.

"The governor says there are now two blocks around University at Buffalo that are now tax free and I say, 'governor, in Texas, the entire state is tax free; in Florida, the entire state is tax free,' " Collins said. "This is all smoke and mirrors. If it wasn't so sad, it would be a joke. He's creating this illusion that New York is prospering."

Moss also spoke out against the SAFE Act and Common Core.

He said first thing on the agenda for an Astorino/Moss administration would be defunding and repealing the SAFE Act.

He also announced that yesterday, the campaign had turned in 65,000 signatures had been gathered to create a party line on the election ballot for an Anti-Common Core Party. Such a line, he said, could tip the election to Astorino.

Yunker, Collins and Moss.

Chris Moss

Moss, who is sheriff of Chemung County and president of the New York Sheriff's Association, with Susan Maha and Sheriff Gary Maha.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 10:12 am

Webber and Yunkers art now on display at Richmond Memorial Library

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, art, Richmond Memorial Library

Local, award-winning artists Terry Webber and Bernice Yunkers have a joint exhibit at the Richmond Memorial Library now through the end of August.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 10:06 am

New library director returns to WNY after 22 years in Chicago area

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Richmond Memorial Library

Richmond Memorial Library patrons and supporters got a chance to meet new director Bob Conrad during a reception Tuesday.

Conrad is originally from Rochester, a 1992 graduate of Eastridge High School. He lived for 22 years in the Chicago area where he earned an undergraduate degree in Radio, TV and Film and a graduate degree in Library and Information Science.

He worked for 10 years in the Chicago library system before he decided he wanted to take his career to the next level. He started looking for jobs in New York and California and when he found the opening in Batavia he said it was "a perfect fit."

As a new director, he's not coming in looking to make a lot of changes. We have something good here in a library, he said, and he wants to keep it that way.

"I want the best library that this community can support and the best library that can support the community," Conrad said, adding, "Right now, I'm just learning the job. I'm delighted that the staff all seem to know what they're doing and that the community really treasures the institution, so my first job is not (to) break it."

Conrad is buying a home in Batavia, but in the meantime, he's staying with family in the Rochester area.

He's very familiar with WNY. His family took annual trips to Letchworth and Watkins Glen and he worked at Seabreeze in high school. But when Conrad started spreading the news that he was taking a job in Batavia, it prompted a little geography lesson for those around him in Illinois. They are far more familiar with another Batavia (their very own).

"I did have to disambiguate to all of my colleagues when telling them where I was going to be library director," Conrad said.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at 3:41 pm

Moss, but not Astorino will make campaign stops in Batavia today

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Chris Moss, politics, Rob Astorino

Gubernatorial candidate Rob Astorino was scheduled to be in Batavia today, but he had a family emergency and is unable to make his scheduled campaign appearances.

His running mate Chris Moss will however be at the the GOP Women's meeting at 6:30 p.m. at Batavia Downs, and then he will also speak at the SCOPE meeting at 7 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church, 3515 Galloway Road.

The sign placed in front of Batavia Marine on West Main anticipated Astorino being in town today, but then his plans changed.

Astorino, who hopes to unseat Andrew Cuomo, has been crisscrossing the state for several months, but has yet to make an appearance in Genesee County.

CORRECTION: Astornio visited Genesee County two days after announcing his candidacy. He made an appearance at Larry's Steakhouse.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at 3:27 pm

Penny Carnival planned for Austin Park NEXT Friday

Mary Repast, Kim Floskowski and Lisa Wittmeyer were in Austin Park yesterday handing out fliers to promote a Penny Carnival hosted by Community Action of Orleans and Genesee Counties.

The Carnival will be in the park next Friday, Aug. 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Children are encouraged to bring pennies.

The event is co-sponsored by the Salvation Army, Care-A-Van and Jr. Angels in Action.

There will be games and prizes.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at 9:47 am

Batavia PD plans round of alcohol sales compliance checks

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia

Press release:

The Batavia Police Department will be conducting alcohol sale compliance checks at points of service and sales on future dates. The Police provide this service to the community to ensure all vendors are vigilant in properly identifying the age of persons who are buying alcohol. The Police Department partners with Genesee Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (GCASA) and has learned through their surveys from the community that underage alcohol consumption is still a concern. Abuse of alcohol by underage individuals is a cause of accidents and other poor choices for this age group. Compliance checks are a way to demonstrate, not only to the vendors but to underage individuals, that this community cares about the wellness of its citizens.

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