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Pavilion man accused of selling controlled substance to undercover agent

Keith Reamer

A 38-year-old Pavilion man has been arrested and accused of selling Clonazepam to an agent of the Genesee County Drug Enforcement Task Force.

Keith G. Reamer Jr., of Hartwell Road, is charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance, 5th, and criminal possession of a controlled substance, 5th.

Clonazepam is a sedative sometimes used to treat epilepsy, panic attacks and other ailments. Recreational users have described a slight euphoric feeling from the drug. An overdose can cause respiratory failure.

Reamer was arraigned in Town of Pavilion Court and released under supervision of Genesee Justice.

The task force was assisted by uniformed deputies in the arrest of Reamer.

Dave Olsen
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Having never heard of Clonazepam before, I googled it and found a recreational drug users site. Basically it has the same effect as alcohol. Sounds like a big old waste of our law enforcement and justice system's time. Give this guy a fine and move on.

Mark Brudz
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Actually Dave, that is not true, Clonazepam is a generic name for Klonopin primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy.

http://www.rxlist.com/klonopin-side-effects-drug-center.htm

The effects are more akin to Bath Salts if overdosed, The more serious side effects possible from normal usage include

confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior;
unusual risk-taking behavior, no fear of danger;
weak or shallow breathing;
unusual or involuntary eye movements;
pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest;
painful or difficult urination, urinating less than usual;
pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding; or
new or worsening seizures.

Dave Olsen
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Symptoms of alcohol poisoning:
Confusion
Loss of coordination
Vomiting
Seizures
Irregular or slow breathing (less than eight breaths a minute)
Blue-tinged or pale skin
Low body temperature (hypothermia)
Stupor – when someone’s conscious but unresponsive
Unconsciousness – passing out

Having used alcohol in excess (not proud of that) I can attest to:
confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior;
unusual risk-taking behavior, no fear of danger;

So again, not much difference. Excess is bad

I'm not condoning recreational drug use by any means, I'm just saying that too much time and resources are spent on stuff like this investigation and arrest.

Doug Yeomans
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The effects are more akin to Bath Salts if overdosed <---- I don't see that in anything I'm reading about it klonopin. I don't even see hallucinations as a side effect. The most common side effects are:

Drowsiness
Interference with cognitive and motor performance
Dryness of mouth
Euphoria (Mostly due to anxiolytic properties)

Doug Yeomans
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hmmm...maybe hallucinations, but I doubt it

Bernie Thompson
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I am with you on that posting Doug because I didn't see anything either. Nice job with your research input!

Christopher Putnam
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Do you think the authorities are ever going to notice this simple fact--------> Some People want to use and abuse drugs. Nothing you do is going to stop or deter them in the least. I am pretty sure that this guy was not going up to people saying "Hey you want to buy some Clonazepam?" he was selling to people that sought him out for the express purpose of buying drugs from him. Now im not condoning his actions. What im saying is this, your super expensive, super war on drugs, has FAILED UTTERLY. Your wasting money, to no appreciable effect. The people that bought drugs from this man, will buy drugs from a different man tomorrow. Then you arrest him, and they will buy drugs from a third man. You are accomplishing nothing except creating a minor inconvenience to the drug buyers. While placing a huge financial burden on the taxpayers to pay for your bloated, useless, inefficient POLICE and COURTS.
Its human nature to want to abuse and use mind altering or mood altering drugs. People have been doing it since we were primitive peoples. The only thing you have accomplished by making it illegal, is placing a huge financial burden on yourselves, the tax payers.
So good luck with that.
Im going to go watch Lone Ranger and smoke some marijuana, marijuana that i had no trouble purchasing at all. I mean, i have like 15 people i can call to get some herb, so good job on getting those "drug dealers" off the "street" lemme write it in internet speak for you.
lol u r fail.

Dave Olsen
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Right there with you on that Christopher. We all need to demand smaller and more limited government, including ending the "war on drugs" my hope is that as more and more people demand less of their income be seized by the state, they will be forced to end it along with many other wastes of time and money.

Kyle Couchman
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Someone I take care of has this prescription and while I cant discuss what its for and whom. It is generally used in hospital settings for anxiety, especially in the evening when the anxiety interferes with sleep.

Mark Brudz
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"Clonazepam has wreaked such havoc on people partly because it is so highly addictive; anyone who takes it for more than a few weeks may well develop a dependence on it. As a result, you can be prescribed Klonopin as a short-term treatment for, say, insomnia, and wind up so hooked on it that you’ll begin frantically “doctor shopping” for new prescriptions if the first physician who gave it for you refuses to renew the prescription. As with all benzos, use of Klonopin for more than a month can lead to a dangerous condition known as “benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome,” featuring elevation of a user’s heart rate and blood pressure along with insomnia, nightmares, hallucinations, anxiety, panic, weight loss, muscular spasms or cramps, and seizures."

http://www.cchrint.org/2011/06/02/americas-most-dangerous-pill-klonopin/

Kyle is correct, it is usually administered in a hospital setting for a limited time. It is used also for people suffering from severe alcohol problems [WHILE THEY ARE IN REHAB]

It is NOT a harmless high, not like Alcohol or Marijuana and IS extremely addictive. The comparison to Bath Salts is the real possibility of dangerous personality changes that require interventions.

Pharmaceuticals are not like smoking a joint or drinking a beer. Elevations of heart rate and blood pressures can and do kill, we are not talking slight increases when Klonopin withdrawals are concerned.

Why am I so adamant? In 2010 my cousin had trouble sleeping, a friend of hers gave her 1 Clonazepam tablet, an hour later, she had a seizure as a result and is dead, no over dose, no addiction 1 pill.

Greg Rada
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I appreciate the hard work it takes to tackle the drug issue of our society. Illegal use and trafficking of drugs is directly linked to all sorts of crimes. One particular crime would be slavery, especially of women and children. So by attack the drug problem, we can attack other more serious problems as well. To simply say "they're going to do it anyway so why bother" opens a door to a mess of problems. Even the idea of legalizing drugs can lead to a society based of self indulgence and advancements in how to get or improve the next "high." Self improvement and a betterments for humanity as a whole goes out the window because it's easier and more pleasurable not too.
The path to bettering ourselves starts with recognizing that self destructive behaviors and illegal use of drugs is wrong all the way around. It's a tough path with plenty of mistakes ahead, but its very much worth it. We are better than this.

Dave Olsen
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Sorry for your loss Mark.

Mr. Rada, I will share a link with you and you can read up on the subject of drug prohibition. http://www.leap.cc/

Kyle Couchman
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I can relate to that Mark. But the people I take care of in my volunteer work generally have a diagnosis of 90 days or less. While some do beat whatever condition they are fighting, Most do not. So in this particular setting they consider the short term benefits vs the long term liabilites.

So certain circumstances can change the use of some of these drugs. Just wanted to throw that out there into the discussion. I feel that without a prescription if you have someone out there 'dealing' a drug like this, there is where the criminal and punitive parts of drug laws need to be applied more regularly.

Laws are in place, personal responsibility comes into play here and if you take the chance to sell then you get caught you just pay the price.

Gerald Robinson
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I think what you guys are forgetting is some of the other side effects of drug abuse and use. It might start out as recreational and then that buzz isn't enough so they look for something else that's going to give them a better buzz. Then they can't afford it or can't afford to feed their family and they rob a store or a pizza delivery guy so that they can have the money. Then i have to read these comments about all the illegal activity in Batavia and how it's going down hill. You might not think it's all related but it is.

Jeff Allen
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David Cross + 50 lbs

Beth Kinsley
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Wow Mark and Kyle. Thanks for sharing that. I had it prescribed by a doctor for insomnia several years ago but I didn't like how it made me feel and it didn't help me sleep so I stopped taking it after a few days. I never got the feeling from this doctor that it was only supposed to be short term. If I recall there were several refills that I never filled. This doctor also prescribed hydrocodone like it was going out of style. I didn't like that either so never bothered to take it. I even heard her prescribe Ambien to a teenager once. Needless to say, this doctor is no longer practicing.

Dave Olsen
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I am forgetting nothing. Abuse is abuse, addiction is addiction whether it be drugs, alcohol, sex or gambling, all have ruined lives and pushed people to commit crimes. What you are not considering is that drugs are more expensive, harder to obtain and more dangerous expressly due to prohibition. When alcohol was illegal from 1920- 1933, it also was much more expensive, harder to obtain and sometimes dangerous, due to bathtub gin and moonshine concoctions. Not to mention the violence that came along with the trafficking. Now it is cheap, sold everywhere and regulated as to content. Drugs can be handled the same way. The war on drugs is a waste of time and money, solves no societal problems, ruins lives, violates the freedom of the individual and sucks money from other proper roles for government.

Frank Bartholomew
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Greg, the war on drugs is a waste of hard earned dollars. Alcohol is legal, and wreaks the same brand of havoc on those who choose to abuse it, enough said.

Mark Brudz
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You know Dave, I agree with you on MJ and the war on drugs, it is a waste of time, but pharmaceuticals and opiates are a different matter all together.

Right here in Batavia, there have been several cases of first time Cocaine users having massive heart attacks at age 25, 32 and 45, you do not hear about the cocaine part pretty much because of HIPPA and no police involvement in some of those cases, but it happens all the time.

Pharmaceuticals for example developed to ease seizures can actually cause seizures in people that never had them. Pharmaceuticals developed for depression given to those who do not suffer from clinical depression can actually develop clinical depression as a result.

When physicians prescribe drugs with possible side effects, they do so weighing the risk with the possible benefit and always take full medical histories into account.

I don't care if someone drinks or smokes a joint as long as they do not get behind the wheel of a car after or while doing so, the addictive effects are between them their doctor and their families, but pharmaceuticals can and do kill, and I side with Kyle on that, that is exactly where law enforcement should focus their efforts.

I also find myself in rare agreement with Frank to a point, but there are some things that cry out for prevention and interdiction, not so much because of addiction, but because of the imminent risk of immediate death.

Greg Rada
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I believe the fight against drugs is a valid fight. It would be cheaper and work far better if our society worked to help the fight. Come together as communies should and say "we don't want this, we are better than this." I'm not talking about the minor stuff, I'm talking about the large quantities of poison flooding our streets, infecting our schools, and chemlabs in basements of apartment houses ready to blow. Turning our backs saying "it's okay as long as it doesn't bother me" or "it's not that big of a deal" is what aids good streets to go bad. Towns and cities turn to rot. If you think there can be improvements to help the fight, by all means come forward and help the cause. We know what is right and we know what is wrong. We have a moralistic core and we need to listen to it. This isn't about my perspective or and "extreme" POV. It's about common sense. Fighting for what is good and decent.

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. ~ Edmund Burke

Christopher Putnam
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Greg your sadly mistaken sir. If you would care do do some research into the Countries that have legalized all drugs, or most, you will learn that not only doesn't the society ROT, they prosper, drug related crimes ALMOST cease to exist. NON drug related crimes also take a steep decline. Go ahead and look at Portugal and The Netherlands as examples. Both first world countries, neither ROTTING, and drugs are either legal, or tolerated. Treatment is focused on education and prevention. NOT ARREST AND DETENTION.

I like to look at this occasionally and ask myself, what could our country have done with this money instead of squandering it. Improved our education system? Feed and house the homeless? --------> http://www.drugsense.org/cms/wodclock

Mark Brudz
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Chris, The tolerance in the Netherlands and Portugal are for Cannabis not opiates and barbiturates like this thread is referring to

In the Netherlands for example, POT is a Schedule II according to their laws, up to 5 grams for personal use will get you no more than a ticket and a referral for counseling unless you use it in a 'Coffee House" which is authorized for POT and HASH. Possession of 30 grams of POT in the Netherlands can land you a significant jail term, although that jail which is specifically for drug crimes mandates treatment programs.

Selling POT however, is a different matter.

The sale of Cocaine, barbiturates and most controlled pharmaceuticals in the Netherlands for example is a crime and gets you jail time. Which under Dutch Law are Schedule I - POT is Schedule II

http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/html.cfm/index5174EN.html?pluginMethod=eldd....

Rather than referencing a pro legalization site with am agenda and a Bias, try the source

http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/ which is the site for all Drug and Addiction laws and DATA for Europe.

You are correct in a big way though, the emphasis in The Netherlands especially is big on treatment

All of Europe, including the Government of The Netherlands is involved in seizing opiate shipments and stopping production in Afghanistan and Columbia

http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/how/finance/documents/eu_cocaine_route_con...

Opiate pricing isn't all that much cheaper in Europe although cheaper

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/secured/wdr/Cocaine_Heroin_Prices.pdf

Easing laws and legalization of POT would pretty much take the teeth out of a lot of of the federal and state budgets I agree with that, but this guy sold a pharmaceutical which is a bit different than the War On Drugs per se.

To be clear, Marijuana I say make it legal and controlled with regard to minors. But beyond that Opiates and pharmaceuticals is a completely different animal

Kyle Couchman
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I think Mark needs to move his computer farther from the window in his house. It appears he froze his enter key. LOL

Either that or the cold has created an echo in here ...

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