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Monday, April 7, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Sponsored Post: Regular workouts at Oakfield Fitness deliver more energy, better endurance

At 42 years old, Bill Taylor thinks its important to stay in shape as he gets older. He needs more energy in his physically demanding job and just generally wants to feel better.

Oakfield Fitness and Cross-Training Center, with its full range of newer equipment and 24/7 availability does the trick for him, he said.

"Everybody feels different at different parts of the day," Taylor said.

As he's gotten more serious about physical fitness, he said he has more energy and improved endurance.

"It's just all around feeling better physically, mentally, too," he said.

For anybody who doesn't have a workout routine, Taylor's advice is simple: "Get off your butt and do it. That's the best way."

Oakfield Fitness moved just a few weeks ago, going from 1,800 square feet and multiple small rooms, to three logically organized rooms in 3,600 square feet. There's a room for weight machines, a cardio room and a cross-training room.

All of the equipment is quality Life Fitness machines.

A basic gym membership is $30 a month with no other fees and no annual contract. Cross-training members pay $80 per month and have access to the cross-training room and a cross-training coach during scheduled times.

For more information, visit OakfieldFitness.com.

Monday, March 31, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Sponsored Post: Oakfield Fitness moves into larger space on North Main Street

More space and more equipment are part of an expanded Oakfield Fitness and Cross-Training Center after the business moved just down the street to 116 North Main St., Oakfield.

The gym has moved from a location where there was only 1,800 square feet and equipment was distributed among several small rooms, to one with 3,600 square feet and three large rooms.

There is one room for strength equipment -- Hammer Strength machines from Life Fitness -- a room of cardio machines, including Life Fitness treadmills and bikes as well as rowing machines, and a cross-training room with free weights and various training aids.

The gym is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and a basic membership is $30 per month (no other costs, no annual contract).

For those interested cross-training, a certified Cross Fit trainer, Steve Wakefield, is available from 5 a.m. to 8 a.m., Monday thru Saturday, and 6 to 8 p.m., Monday through Thursday.

Cross-training is $80 per month, which includes a basic gym membership and workouts with Wakefield and other cross-trainers. Use of the cross-training room is limited to cross-training members.

Oakfield Fitness will host an open house Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon. Attend either open house and receive two days of free use of the gym at no obligation to join.

For more information, visit OakfieldFitness.com.

More pictures after the jump:

Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 8:39 pm

Sponsored Post: Oakfield Fitness, a convienent and well equipped place to maintain health

A busy MBA student at St. John Fisher, Katie Joslyn, needs to make sure never has an excuse for missing a work out.

The 22-year-old Oakfield resident said Oakfield Fitness and Cross Training Center, at 116 North Main St., is perfect for her. It's right in the village, is open 24/7 and has all the cardio and weight machines she wants to use.

"I've seen it grow," said Joslyn, who has been a member since the gym first opened at a smaller, store-front location. "It's really become something. It's a lot better than it used to be. I love coming here."

Oakfield Fitness moved just a few weeks ago, going from 1,800 sq. ft. and multiple small rooms, to three logically organized rooms in 3,600 sq. ft. There's a room for weight machines, a cardio room and a cross training room.

All of the equipment is quality Life Fitness machines.

A basic gym membership is $30 a month with no other fees and no annual contract. Cross training members pay $80 per month and have access to the cross training room and a cross training coach during scheduled times.

For more information, visit OakfieldFitness.com.

Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 7:55 pm

Sponsored Post: Cross training at Oakfield Fitness provides functional health

The end result of cross training, Steve Wakefield said, is functional fitness. Your body is better conditioned to work for you.

For example, your body is built to squat. That's something that can be harder to do with any stamina if you haven't developed your muscles appropriately.

"I spent three years in Afghanistan and every meeting for me was in a squat," Wakefield said. "I was like, 'oh, I've got to squat again,' but that's what your body is supposed to do.  Cross training teaches your body to go back and use the movement it's supposed to."

Wakefield, a certified Cross Fit trainer, is the cross training coach at Oakfield Fitness and Cross Training Center, 116 North Main St., Oakfield.

Oakfield fitness recently moved into a larger building with an expanded cross training center.

Wakefield said cross training is a suitable physical fitness program for just about anybody, whether you're already athletic or haven't worked out in years and need to lose weight.

"You can do every workout to your own ability, which is awesome and I love it," Wakefield said. "Even as a trainer, I'm not as strong as some of these guys, but I lower the weight to my ability and I do what I can do. I've got an older lady, in her 60s, who's here everyday. She can do the workout. It's scaled to her."

Cross training, by definition is a constantly varied functional workout. Every session is different and it's not just about lifting weights and working specific muscles. You won't come in one day thinking, "this is my day to work my biceps" as you would with traditional fitness regimes.

"We've been taught for years that 'today I'm going to do by bi's and back and tomorrow my tri's and chest,'" Wakefield said. "Cross training is breaking out of that model of isolated muscle movement. It's whole body, functional fitness."

The program also includes seminars on nutrition.

"You can workout every day, but if your nutrition is off, it's not going to work," Wakfield said. "Cross training isn't who is the fittest. We want to get you healthy."

Since cross training is usually a daily workout with a regular group of people, and the classes become more like a group of friends.

That's one of the things that kept Wakefield interested cross training once he got started.

"We get to know each other," Wakefield said. "We get to know each other's families. We get to know each other's strengths and goals. We clap harder for the person who is last trying to finish up than the person who is done first."

It costs $80 per month to take part in cross training at Oakfield Fitness, and that includes full 24/7 access to the entire gym.

For more information, visit OakfieldFitness.com.

More pictures after the jump:

Friday, March 21, 2014 at 10:47 am

Health Department: 15 of 31 wells tested positive for bacteria and E. coli

post by Howard Owens in batavia, health, Oakfield, water

Press release:

Since the initiation of the Boil Water Advisory (BWA) one week ago 31 private drinking water wells have been tested, with 15 confirmed to have bacteriological contamination of coliform bacteria and E. coli. Residents who have had their water tested and confirmed positive have been notified at this time.

These organisms can cause diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants and people with compromised immune systems. Residents in this area who are experiencing these symptoms should contact their medical provider.

The Genesee County Health Department continues to assist the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) with their investigation to determine the exact origin and extent of the contamination.

Residents near Batavia-Oakfield Townline Road east of Rt 63 and Lewiston Road south of Batavia-Oakfield Townline Road are urged to continue following the instructions below until their water can be confirmed safe to drink.

Instructions: Boil (rolling boil for one minute) tap water or use bottled water for drinking and cooking. If well water quality changes as noticed by color and/or smell, immediately stop using it for all household uses other than flushing toilets.

For additional information about a Boil Water Advisory (BWA) and how to stay safe during one, visit: http://www.readygenesee.com/BoilWaterAdvisory.pdf.

For additional information on coliform bacteria please visit:

http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/water/drinking/docs/coliform_bacteria.pdf

Friday, March 14, 2014 at 5:34 pm

Alert issued over possible manure spill in Batavia-Oakfield area

There is apparently a recommendation for a small number of Genesee County residents to boil their household water because of a possible manure spill in the area of Batavia Oakfield Townline Road and Lewiston Road.

The announcement came from the NY-Alert system, not from the County Health Department.

The announcement was released just before the health department closed for the weekend, though it contained information to call the health department for further information.

The announcement says, "At this time, the extent of the contamination is unknown and we would therefore recommend that you boil tap water in your home or use bottled water for drinking and cooking. If your well water quality changes as noticed by color and/or smell, immediately stop using it for all household uses other than flushing toilets."

The first version of the announcement was a recommendation for all Genesee County residents to boil water, then a second version said the spill was in the area of Batavia-Oakfield Townline Road and Lewiston Road.

Because the health department is closed, no further information is available at this time.

Sunday, January 26, 2014 at 8:31 pm

Clear Your Energy with a Charka Workshop at Blue Pearl Yoga

post by Patricia Hawley in announcements, batavia, alternative medicine, health, yoga

A chakra workshop designed to relieve stress and increase energy is scheduled for February 1 at Blue Pearl Yoga. Rich Hayden, a certified yoga, meditation, and chakra instructor will lead the class on a path to renewed wellness. This class is suitable for all ages; pre-registration is required.

 

Chakras are points in the subtle human body located at the physical counterparts of arteries, veins, and nerves. Since charkas are not part of the human body they can most accurately be described as energy centers connected by channels. Each Chakra has its own characteristics, responsible for receiving and expressing energy. Through a series of simple yoga poses and breathing exercises students will learn how to activate energy while relieving stress, tension, and depression. “Keeping these energy field clear and balanced is one of the best form of preventative medicine and self-care,” according to Karen Reisdorf, owner of Blue Pearl Yoga.

Workshop facilitator Rich Hayden has been a yoga instructor at Blue Pearl Yoga for 8 years and has lead several Chakra Workshops. He says that participants will learn to attend to their Chakra through meditation, poses, and chanting to “establish health on a solid basis and increase energy.” During meditation, he says, “we focus on color and sound. Each chakra has a corresponding color connected to it and has a tremendous strengthening effect on the physical body.” The resulting outcome of this workshop is “peace, joy, and a true love of life.” 

The Chakra Workshop with Rich Hayden is scheduled for Saturday, February 1 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Blue Pearl Yoga, 200 East Main Street, third floor. Cost is $35.00 and pre-registration is required. For more information contact Karen Reisdorf at 585.813.5430.

Friday, November 22, 2013 at 7:29 pm

Ask the Local Doctor: What's the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes?

This week's question: What’s the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and is either one reversible / curable?

In Diabetes Type 1, the body does not produce insulin. This occurs when a person's own body has destroyed the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. This is where a person does not produce insulin which takes glucose into cells for growth and energy. In Type 1 diabetes, your own immune system destroys cells in your pancreas, so little if any insulin is made. This type of diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes or childhood diabetes. This type of diabetes is not preventable and not related to lifestyle. It makes no difference whether a person is fat, thin, fit or unfit in regards to a person developing Type 1 diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes need to take insulin daily, either injected or through an insulin pump. However, research is currently being undertaken to find a way to reverse Type 1 diabetes, and a vaccine is currently being developed which may help to reverse this disease. There is no way to reverse Type 1 diabetes at this time.

In Diabetes Type 2, the cells do not respond correctly to the insulin. People with Diabetes Type 2 have one of two problems, and sometimes both. Either not enough insulin is being produced, or the insulin is not working properly, which is known as insulin resistance. The vast majority of patients who develop Type 2, did so because they were overweight and unfit for some time. This type of diabetes tends to appear later on in life and often called adult onset diabetes. However, there have been more and more cases of people in their 20s developing Type 2, but it is still relatively uncommon. Approximately 85 percent of people who have diabetes have this type of diabetes. Lack of physical activity, being overweight, and some genetic factors make it much more likely that the cells build up insulin resistance more quickly. It is important to remember that insulin resistance is not the insulin responding properly, but the cells not responding properly to the insulin. With time and dedication, Type 2 diabetes can be reversed and the results can be very rewarding with less tiredness and better all-round health. Loss of body weight and exercise can be particularly beneficial in helping to reverse the progression of diabetes. In some cases, people may find they are able to come off medication, although blood sugar levels should be checked regularly as reversing progression of diabetes is not a cure.

If you have further concerns you should contact your doctor for more information regarding your condition.

Dr. Magdi Credi

Ask the Local Doctor is sponsored by Insource Urgent Care, 35 Batavia City Centre, Batavia, (585) 250-4201. To submit a question to Ask the Local Doctor, e-mail askthedoc@thebatavian.com. To submit your question anonymously, if you wish, you can use our online form.

Monday, November 4, 2013 at 8:48 pm

Ask the Local Doctor: Should I get a flu shot?

NOTE: This is The Batavian's first "Ask the Local Doctor" column sponsored by Insource Urgent Care. We announced the column and then no questions came in, or so we thought. Their e-mail forwarding wasn't set up right so we didn't see the questions. We actually received about a dozen questions. Those questions have been forwarded to the professional staff of Insource Urgent Care and will be considered for next week's column and subsequent columns.

This column is by Dr. Magdi Credi and it answers the question, should I get a flu shot?

The influenza season is upon us.

Here at Insource Urgent Care the vaccine is being offered for those who are 4 years and older. Unbeknownst to many, influenza is still the most prevalent disease in the United States of all the vaccinated diseases.

About 200,000 persons in the United States will be hospitalized yearly due to influenza. Up to 49,000 deaths occur yearly on American soil due to the flu. Because of this, we here at Insource are doing our best to protect you.

The Center for Disease Control currently recommends all persons older than 6 months be vaccinated. The more persons vaccinated the less chance of the flu.

In particular, two groups are strongly encouraged to obtain the flu shot: those who are at high risk of complications (i.e. pneumonia) and those who care for others at high risk. This would include the following: Parents and caretakers of children less than 6 months of age, pregnant women, persons less than 5 years old or older than 65 years old, and persons with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, asthma, and COPD to name a few. This list is not all inclusive and can be checked out on the CDC’s Web site www.cdc.gov for more information.

If still unsure of your risk or need, please stop by our medical office for clarification. We are here to provide top medical care for you and to protect both you and your family.

This post is sponsored by Insource Urgent Care, 35 Batavia City Centre, Batavia, (585) 250-4201. To submit a question to Ask the Local Doctor, e-mail askthedoc@thebatavian.com.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 at 6:13 pm

Eating Healthy Away from Home

post by Leslie DeLooze in diet, health, library programs, nutrition
Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St., Batavia will host "Eating Healthy Away from Home" on Thursday, April 11 at 6:00 p.m. Don't let your good and healthy eating habits go awry when you eat out or travel. Find out how during this program presented by Jennifer Reardon, MS, RD, CDN and Amy Miller, RD, CDE. To register, call the Healthy Living Office at 344-5331.

Event Date and Time

April 11, 2013 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
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