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Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 9:06 pm

Petition drive started to protest further tax incentives for COR and Dick's Sporting Goods

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Batavia Towne Center, business, GCEDC

Press Release from Phil Ricci, chairman of the Gensee County Libertarian Committee:

Dick's Sporting Goods also does not expect to win, or ask for, tax abatements to expand here. "Our goal is to deliver everything at the lowest price," Hennion said. "We really don't feel like we should be using customers' money to build our stores."

That was a direct quote from the VP of Dick's Sporting Goods!

The classification of the Batavia Towne Center as a "tourist destination" is laughable at best, and a complete deception regardless. More than $6 million dollars has already been promised to COR over a 10 year period. Yet even though the company did not complete many of the promises within the original project, they are asking for an additional $ 1 million in "tax incentives" to re-fit a previously failed space!

No tax payer should be asked to subsidize a multi-billion dollar retail chain, so they can do business in their town, but what's even worse is when that retailer is not asking for the help!

Stop the abuse! Tell Mary Pat Hancock and the GCEDC Board to not approve the additional funds!

Sign the petition: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/706/682/307/stop-the-additional-funding-of-tax-incentives-to-cor-for-dicks-sports/

About the Genesee County Libertarian Committee: Advocate. Educate. Choice. The Genesee County Libertarian Party. For more information, please join us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/GCLP.NY.
Also Please join us for our first fundraiser, April 13th at Batavia Downs! http://thebatavian.com/lisa-ace/sponsored-post-celebrate-liberty-night/36799
Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 3:00 pm

Batavia Towne Center expected to generate more than $4.3 million in new tax revenue by 2018

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Batavia Towne Center, business, GCEDC

NOTE: There was a big mistake in the original headline of this post about the amount of property taxes that would be generated over 10 years.  The correct number is $4.3 million, not the significantly higher number previously quoted.

Batavia Towne Center, in the four years since the first stores opened there, has generated more than $500,000 in new property tax revenue for schools and county government.

It's also generated more than $500,000 in new fire tax revenue for the Town of Batavia.

We don't know how much sales tax it's generated because those figures are considered confidential. But COR Development estimated -- when it applied to GCEDC in 2006 for tax abatements for the project -- that at build-out, the center would add more than $4.5 million in annual sales tax to the state and county treasuries.

Under the current terms of the agreement between COR and the Genesee County Economic Development Center, Batavia Towne Center will generate an estimated $4.3 million in property tax and fire tax revenue by 2018.

COR is asking that the original agreement be modified to help the company attract Dick's Sporting Goods along with one or two other retailers to the former Lowe's location.

There are three tax abatements under consideration:

  • $180,000 sales tax exemptions
  • $43,750 mortgage tax exemption
  • $828,390 property tax exemption

Before there was a Batavia Towne Center there was 47-acre parcel of land that didn't have much on it except for the Wood Hill Trailer Park off Park Road that -- according to a June 22, 2006 article in the Batavia Daily News -- was filled with aging trailers that once housed race jockeys from Batavia Downs.

The total assessed value in 2008 was $1.6 million.

After Batavia Towne Center opened, the assessed value jumped to $14.5 million.

Under the terms of the original agreement with GCEDC, COR received a $6 million tax incentive package:

  • $2,078,400 sales tax exemption
  • $312,500 mortgage tax exemption
  • $3.6 million property tax exemption

COR was planning a 375,000-square-foot shopping plaza that would be anchored by Target and Lowe's with Bed, Bath & Beyond, PetCo and Michael's, as other key tenants.

It would cost COR an estimated $40 million to build the center.

COR estimated at build-out the stores would employ 364 full-time equivalents (FTEs), who would be paid $9.9 million in annual wages, and the stores would generate $4.6 million in annual sales tax on $667 million in gross annual sales.

In 2007, the project was split into two parts, because Target insist on owning the building and real estate of their own stores, so the benefits and liabilities of the project are now split between COR and Target.

For the life of the agreements, both COR and Target are required to submit an annual report to GCEDC on employment.

By the time all of the stores were open in 2009, COR and Target reported a combined 365 FTEs.

As the economy declined after 2009, so did employment, dropping to 341 FTEs in 2011.

After Lowe's closed, the number of FTEs dropped to 270 in 2012.

The bulk of the incentive package for COR (all numbers in this story roll up COR and Target as if it were still a single project) was the property tax abatement.

The abatement is known as a PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes). 

A PILOT is designed to forgive a portion of property taxes on the increased assessed value on a parcel of real estate that are the result of improvements.

In the case of Batavia Towne Center, as stated above, the property's assessment rose from $1.6 million to $14.5 million.

COR continued to pay property taxes on the original $1.6 million assessed value, but in 2010, when the assessed value jumped so dramatically, it paid no property taxes on that additional $12.9 million in assessed value.

Under state law, fire district taxes cannot be waived, so when the assessed value jumped, so did the amount COR pays for fire services in the Town of Batavia.  Currently, COR and Target pay more than $266,000 annually in fire protection taxes.

Starting in 2011, COR began paying taxes on 20 percent of the increased assessed value, or on $2.6 million of the new additional assessed value.

This year, COR's share jumps to 40 percent of the assessed value.

By 2017, COR will be paying 80 percent of the increase in assessed value and the PILOT expires in 2019, at which point, COR and Target will be paying property taxes on 100 percent of the increased assessed value, or about $4.1 annual in property taxes.

The bulk of those taxes go to the school district with the rest going to the county.  The Town of Batavia currently has a zero property tax rate.

The projected numbers are based on the current assessed value, which is subject to change annually.

For the exemption of the center to accommodate Dick's and other retailers, COR is asking for the PILOT to be amended to cut the taxes on the new assessed value of that portion of the project.

Currently, the portion of the property that contains Lowe's is assessed at $6.9 million.

The improvements will increase the assessment to an estimated $8.6 million.

COR is asking for an amended PILOT just for that parcel that will begin at the 40 percent of increased assessment value and extend the life of the PILOT (just for that parcel) through 2024.

Rather than going up 20 percent every two years, the 40 percent of assessed value would last for three years, then go up to 50 percent for two years, 60 percent for two years, 70 percent for two years and 80 percent for two years.

In 2007, as we reported earlier, the project was only eligible, as a retail project, for tax incentives, because it was declared a "tourist destination."

Under terms of IDA law, a tourist destination is defined as a location that will attract a significant amount of traffic from people living outside of the IDA's service area.

In this case, from outside Genesee County.

The agency also had to find that the project would offer a service not otherwise available to county residents.

In a June 8, 2007 letter, COR's VP and attorney Joseph B. Gerardi, wrote in a letter to Steve Hyde, CEO of GCEDC:

It is anticipated that the Towne Center will provide economic and/or tourism opportunities for commercial uses not otherwise readily available to residents of the Genesee County Economic Development Region. ... The Towne Center project is also anticipated to retain a significant percentage of the retail sales available in the Economic Development Region that is likely to be leaving the Region, and create additional economic development activity. This is a result of the potential for Towne Center to attract retail sales from counties that are in near proximity to the Region and/or development.

Legislature Chairwoman Mary Pat Hancock wrote in a letter dated Jan. 2, 2007:

In order to assist the Agency in making such a finding, the Company has represented that the Project is the sole comparably-sized shopping center available to residents of Genesee County and therefore provides a service that would otherwise be unavailable.

Hancock's letter did not address the "tourism destination" designation.

While the project was in development, GCEDC was apparently interested, according to a February, 2007 article in the Batavia Daily News, in adding a multi-screen theater to the project.

COR seemed less than thrilled with the idea, noting that adding theaters would mean less parking, and theater patrons would take up a lot of parking spaces that would otherwise be filled with store shoppers.

The original project proposal also promised restaurants, but none of have been built in the plaza.

COR also promised to plant $200,000 in trees in the parking area.

It's expected that if GCEDC is to grant new tax incentives to COR for Dick's Sporting Goods and other additional retail space, the project will need to be approved as a "tourism destination" and provide goods and services not otherwise available in Genesee County.

In 2005, while discussing sports retail outlets in Forth Worth, Jeff Hennion, then VP of strategic planning for Dick's Sporting Goods, told the Star-Telegram that Dick's wasn't interested in tax incentives for their stores.

"Our goal is to deliver everything at the lowest price," Hennion said. "We really don't feel like we should be using customers' money to build our stores."

UPDATE: Original site plan map added, courtesy COR Developerment.

Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 12:53 pm

No trash haulers planning to offer service to Batavia residents will offer totes

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, garbage collection

If you're a city resident who thought you might get totes for your garbage and recycling starting June 1, you will be very disappointed to learn that none of the haulers planning trash service for Batavia will offer totes.

Not even Waste Management, one of the largest refuse collection companies in the nation, will offer totes in Batavia.

Genesee ARC, who had the contract with the city for garbage collection for 28 years, will offer the same bag and can service the agency has always offered.

Jeff Gardner, starting up Gardner Disposal, will pick up bags and cans, and PSI, based in Alabama, will pick up bags and cans.

Or you can drop off your own bags at Scofield's transfer station in Stafford or the Town of Batavia's transfer station.

But a tote that you can wheel to the curb? Forget about it.

Waste Management will charge $24 a month for up to a dozen 30-gallon bags. The quarterly rate, with fees and fuel charges, will come to $92 to $95.

Genesee ARC will charge $21.95 a month for curbside pick up of cans and bags, or you can buy 10 bags at a time for $30, or ARC will offer a drop-off service at the West Main site is 10 cents per pound.

The new kid on the block, Gardner Disposal, will be locally owned and operated and at least to start. The new owner, Jeff Gardner, will also be the garbage man picking up the trash.

He plans to charge $20 a month for up to seven 13-gallon bags or up to five 30-gallon bags. (Gardner offers more information on his Web site.)

PSI is $25.50 per month for six bags a week.

All services will offer free recycling pick up, but again, no totes.

As for bulk items, prices will vary and picks must be scheduled with your contracted hauler.

Here's a list of companies and phone numbers offering service to Batavia residents

Gardner Disposal: (585) 343-4626
Genesee ARC: (585) 343-1123 or 585-343-4203
PSI Disposal, Inc.: (585) 599-3255
Waste Management, Inc.: (800) 333-6590

Transfer stations to drop off refuse, recycling and bulk items:

Scofield Transfer and Recycling: (585) 343-7373
Town of Batavia Transfer Station: (585) 343-1729

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 10:10 am

Jobs data for Genesee County improved in February

post by Howard B. Owens in business, economy, jobs

There were fewer people listed as unemployed and more jobs in Genesee County for February, according to the latest numbers from the NYS Department of Labor.

The jobs report pegs the local unemployment rate at 9 percent, down from 9.5 percent in January and a four-tenths of a percentage drop from February 2012.

Meanwhile, the number of jobs reported in Genesee County went up from January to February by 100 positions. There were 28,500 jobs reported, which is also an increase over February 2012 when the number was 29,300.

The state's unemployment rate is 8.8 percent, and the nation's 8.1, both improvements over a year ago.

Orleans County's unemployment rate improved from January to February, 11.2 percent compared to 12.3 percent, but still off from the 10.9 percent of a year ago.

In Wyoming County, unemployment went from 11.2 percent down to 10.8 percent month-over-month.

For Livingston County, unemployment is at 10.1 percent, down from 10.3 percent a month earlier.

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 at 9:16 pm

GCEDC must find that tourists will flock to Dick's Sporting Goods in order to offer tax breaks to COR

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Batavia Towne Center, business, GCEDC

Batavia Towne Center -- the location of Target, Bed Bath & Beyond, Michael's, Petco and Radio Shack -- is a tourist destination.

It became a tourist destination in 2007 when the board of the Genesee County Economic Development Center voted to proclaim it a tourist destination and Mary Pat Hancock, chair of the Genesee County Legislature, gave the designation her stamp of approval.

Without the designation, the GCEDC could not have awarded -- under state law at the time -- some $4.5 million in tax breaks for COR Development Company to build the retail shopping center.

The law lapsed in 2008, but is back in force this year, just in time for COR to request another $1 million in tax incentives to help lure Dick's Sporting Goods to Batavia.

The Buffalo News reported on the revival of the law last week, noting that it's the intention of the governor's office to crack down on tax incentives for purely retail projects.

Those retail projects were magnets for controversy because critics said they did not generate new wealth within the region, served a strictly local clientele and favored one business over others that were fighting for a piece of a shrinking local retail market.

Among the exceptions to the law banning tax incentives for retail projects is the declaration that the project is, or is part of, a "tourist destination."

The statute is pretty clear that Albany wants these incentives going only to retail projects that will likely "attract a significant number of visitors from outside the economic development region ... "

Who decides if a project is a tourist destination? According to the Govenor's Office, it's purely a local decision.

It's up to the GCEDC board to conduct a public hearing on the topic. After the public hearing, the board votes. If it votes to declare the project a "tourist destination," there's one last step, and that's for the chair of the governing agency -- in this case, Mary Pat Hancock of the County Legislature -- to approve the designation.

There's no other process to confirm the designation nor appeal the decision.  There's nothing in the statute that allows another authority to overrule the local decision.

For her part, Hancock seems quite convinced that Batavia Towne Center is a tourism destination.

Hancock noted that Batavia Towne Center is right next to the Clarion Hotel, with its new water park, conveniently located near the Thruway and there are lots of hotels in the area. Those hotels bring families to town for hockey tournaments and soccer tournaments, and business travelers might bring their families along these days.

And those people, she said, will want convenient shopping in the area.

"We would certainly like to see that empty building (the former Lowe's location) put to good use and see something there that brings people to the area," Hancock said. "It's conveniently located for people who come here and with the price of gas, it's wonderful that people can come here and mix business with pleasure."

Kelly Rapone, head of tourism for the Genesee County Chamber of Commerce, wanted to emphasize that she's supportive of the proposed project at Batavia Towne Center, but admitted that she's never considered the shopping center a tourism destination and the chamber has never promoted -- as far as she can recall -- the shopping center as a tourism location.

One measure in New York of whether a location is a tourism destination, as established by the promotion campaign "I Love NY," is whether a signficant number of people from more than 50 miles away will travel to the location.

That definition is used in awarding grants to tourism projects, Rapone said.

While the shopping center is good at pulling people from neighboring GLOW counties to Batavia, she isn't sure Batavia Towne Center would measure up to I Love NY's criteria.

"(Batavia Towne Center) is definately an asset to have when people are deciding where to stay while traveling," Rapone said. "They're not going to stay in a hotel when there's nothing around."

She doesn't think, though, that people are going to travel to Batavia and stay in a hotel just to shop at Dick's.

We asked Hancock about a remark by the owner of Barrett's Batavia Marine, Mike Barrett, that tax breaks to COR is like "using your own tax money to put yourself out of business," and Hancock said she certainly hopes that isn't the case.

She doesn't think that's GCEDC's purpose, she said.

"The GCEDC has done great work with our present businesses and works with our businesses to help them expand or move to different locations," Hancock said. "Part of the GCEDC's mission is to retain business and retain jobs and they've been doing a really good job."

LATER THIS WEEK (we hope): Details on the 2007 financial package that helped create Batavia Towne Center.

Friday, March 29, 2013 at 4:24 pm

If Dick's must come, local sports retailers think the big box store shouldn't benefit from tax breaks

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, Dick's Sporting Goods, GCEDC

It's no sure thing that Dick's Sporting Goods is coming to Batavia.

First, there's no official confirmation that Dick's is the client COR Development Company has secured for the former Lowe's location.

Second, Charlie Cook, chairman of the Genesee County Economic Development Center Board, said it's far from a done deal that COR will receive more than $1 million in tax incentives to prepare the 138,778-square-foot space for a new tenant, whoever that may be.

If Dick's is the new game in town, local sporting outlets say they're ready for the competition; they just hope it's a level playing field.

The GCEDC board has yet to officially approve a trio of tax incentives for COR. The only action yesterday was to approve a public hearing for the project, which hasn't even been scheduled yet.

The board has been given scant information about COR's plans, Cook said, and without more information, the board isn't ready to act on the proposal.

"There is no commitment from the EDC for any sort of tax breaks or funding and there won’t be until we have a lot more information," Cook said.

This is the first big retail project that has come before the GCEDC board since Cook's been a member, he said, so he wants to educate himself on what projects like this mean for existing businesses before making a decision.

"I’m still learning," Cook said. "I’ve learned some things on the fly here and have been educated a bit on the impacts that some retailers might have that I hadn’t thought of. I haven’t formed an opinion yet."

Two months ago, a source told The Batavian Dick's Sporting Goods was planning a store at the former Lowe's location; however, repeated phone calls and e-mails to Dick's corporate office since then have been ignored by the corporate giant.

Dick's is a publicly traded company founded in Binghamton and now has 511 stores in 44 states. Annual sales in 2011 (the most recent numbers available) were $5.2 billion with a net profit of $1.6 billion, for a profit margin of 30.6 percent.

Those big numbers mean local retailers selling outdoors equipment and sporting goods face competition from a well-financed behemoth with significant market power.

That isn't scaring at least two local retailers who sell some of the same merchandise as Dick's, but the local owners are unhappy that a giant corporation like Dick's could benefit from any tax incentives given to COR.

Mike Barrett likened the practice of using tax incentives going to corporate chains to "using your own tax money to put yourself out of business."

Still, Barrett's Batavia Marine -- founded in 1955 by his father and uncle -- has been in the same location for decades and Barrett has seen a lot of upstarts come and go.

"We can compete in a lot of different levels they can’t," Barrett said. "Price is one thing and service is another. I knew about this coming for about a year, but we’ve outlasted a lot of other people, so … (Barrett shrugged)"

Kurt Fisher, whose store Fisher Sports is less than two years old, thinks he's found a local niche to serve and his new location in the Court Plaza (off Court Street) is doing well.

He isn't even particularly worried about Dick's potential for offering lower prices.

"The bigger issue for us would be they have more opportunity to have more stock because they have more money to bring everything into the store from every company," Fisher said. "We don't have that opportunity. Olympia (on Lewiston Road) doesn't have that opportunity. They (Dick's) can fill the store with everything, but that doens't mean their prices are good. That's their story everywhere. They have full stores but that doesn't mean they have the best price."

Fisher is ready to compete head-to-head with Dick's, but he doesn't think tax incentives should be used to give a big chain an advantage over local businesses.

"For the town and city to do that, it tells me they're more worried about the Big Box people compared to the smaller business people, for sure," Fisher said. "We don't get tax breaks and we're already in business."

Before today, Charlie Cook said he had no idea that Dick's was the potential tenant for COR. He doesn't even know now if the information is true. He said the GCEDC board was told the confidentially agreement prohibited even the GCEDC board being told who the tenant might be at this stage, even in closed session.

Who the tenant is could be critical information for the board to consider before approving incentives for COR, Cook said.

"I am interested in protecting existing businesses," Cook said. "I think when the facts come out, and more names are divulged (there could be more than one retailer moving into the former Lowe's location), if something isn't going to have an impact on local retailers and actually has attributes that benefit the local economy, you have to look at that differently than a business that competes directly with somebody down the street. Until we know more, we can't make that judgement."

Cook also acknowledged that taxpayers may have legitimate concerns to consider about COR receiving new tax incentives after receiving tax incentives in 2007 to construct the curent building for Lowe's, but "what it comes down to is we're staring at a big empty building and how can we put it to the best use."

Friday, March 29, 2013 at 8:43 am

GCEDC board approves tax breaks for developer of former Lowe's location

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Batavia Showtime, business, GCEDC, Le Roy

CLARIFICATION: Regarding the headline and the item below: The GCEDC board approved the COR project being set for a public hearing, but its project has not yet received final approval.

COR Development Company, owners of property at 4180 Veterans Memorial Drive, Batavia, is planning a $4.5 million investment in the former Lowe's location for renovation, adding space and retrofitting the existing structure. The renovations will pave the way for one or more retailers to lease the space. Total tax incentives: $1,052,104. The project is part of Town Center Batavia, which is 350,000-square-feet of "destination retail space," according to the Genesee County Economic Development Center's release. In 2007, COR received incentives to build the project. The former Lowe's location is currently 138,778 square feet. Under the proposal, COR will receive $180,000 in sales tax exemptions, a $43,750 mortgage tax exemption and a $828,390 property tax exemption on the increased assessment value of the property. COR projects 120 new retail jobs as a result of the project.

Batavia Showtime, 6 Alva Place, Batavia, is planning a $52,200 investment for the purchase and installing of a digital movie projector. Batavia Showtime is approved for a $4,176 sales tax exemption on purchase of the projector. GCEDC's release states that the board is looking to assist in the project because it qualifies as a tourism destination and provides a service to the area, being the only local movie theater, that would not otherwise be available. The theater was in danger of closing prior to Batavia Showtime purchasing the facility. The owner is planning upgrades beyond the purchase of the digital projector. An estimated three new jobs will be created and four jobs retained.

Le Roy Plastics, 59 Lake St., Le Roy, is planning a $885,000 investment for the consolidation of all operations and processes into one facility. The company plans to renovate portions of the new facility and purchase furniture, fixtures and equipment. The GCEDC board approved $43,931 in tax abatements for the project, including a $24,800 sales tax exemption, $9,063 mortgage tax exemption and a $10,068 exemption on property taxes above the current assessed value.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 3:17 pm

Edward Jones' Batavia office celebrates a year of doing business here

post by Billie Owens in business, edward jones

Press release:

The financial investment firm Edward Jones, headquartered in St. Louis, celebrates is first year of doing business in Batavia.

The company provides financial services for individual investors in the United States and, through its affiliate, in Canada. Every aspect of the firm's business -- from the types of investment options offered to the location of branch offices -- is designed to cater to individual investors.

"I've enjoyed doing business the old-fashioned way -- in person," said Michael Marsh, an Edward Jones financial advisor in Batavia. "And I am looking forward to many more years of serving the investment needs of my friends, neighbors and business associates."

The fact that Marsh works in the same community in which he lives is unique among financial services firms, most of which do their business by phone. By establishing one-broker offices in rural and suburban communities, however, Edward Jones enables its financial advisors to establish one-on-one business relationships with its investors.

The firm's 12,000-plus financial advisors work directly with nearly 7 million clients to understand their personal goals -- from college savings to retirement -- and create long-term investment solutions that emphasize a well-balanced portfolio and a buy-and-hold strategy. Edward Jones embraces the importance of building long-term, face-to-face relationships with clients, helping them to understand and make sense of the investment options available today.

In January, for the 14th year, Edward Jones was named one of the best companies to work for by FORTUNE Magazine in its annual listing. The firm ranked No. 8 overall.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 10:21 am

Empire State Development announces $1.5 million in funding for STAMP project

post by Howard B. Owens in Alabama, business, GCEDC, STAMP project

Press release from Empire State Development:

Western New York Science, Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Park – Priority Project (Finger Lakes Region – Genesee County) – Grant - $500,000; Loan $1,100,000

Designated a Priority Project by the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council, the Western New York Science, Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Park (STAMP) will create significant opportunities for semiconductor, flat panel display, photovoltaic, and bio-manufacturing projects.

The Genesee Gateway Local Development Corporation (GGLDC), which serves as the recipient of ESD’s grant and loan, was established in 2004 to handle industrial park development and serves as a conduit for assistance to private companies. Since its inception, GGLDC has completed five park developments across Upstate New York – each of which have infrastructure completed and are able to accommodate new business developments.

In 2005, GGLDC identified a market need to develop a much larger park than those previously developed. Such a mega site, of at least 1,000 acres, would seek to attract a large-scale advanced manufacturing project. GGDLC identified a site in the Town of Alabama, and since 2008 has expended several million dollars for preliminary multifaceted feasibility studies, completed an Environmental Impact Statement, and conducted community outreach and began to acquire property. In order to continue developing STAMP as New York State’s third mega site, ESD is providing a grant of up to $500,000 and a loan of $1.1 million to assist in the purchase of 364 acres of land at the site for the next phase of development.

GGDLC currently owns 143 acres with the option to purchase another 1,073. This real estate transaction will allow for design, engineering and construction for the initial infrastructure at the site, which will be completed by the end of 2014.

This project will position Western New York State as a hub for advanced technology manufacturing and spur significant regional economic growth. There is potential for up to 1,200 jobs at the STAMP site by 2016, and over 9,300 projected jobs at full build-out in 2032.

Monday, March 25, 2013 at 2:56 pm

Photo: New sign for the Batavia Showtime

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Batavia Showtime, business, downtown

The former Dipson Theater's sign on Main Street, Batavia, was updated today with the sign for the renamed theater: Batavia Showtime. Downtown businessman Ken Mistler purchased the theater earlier this month and is planning several renovations.

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