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Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 8:48 am

Drug Task Force announces three arrests

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, crime

Three people have been arrested as the result of two separate investigations into the illegal sale of narcotics in Genesee County.

In the first investigation, arrested were Sege D. Kalmbacher, 39, of Overlook Drive, Batavia, and Paula R. Kalmbacher, 43, of Overlook Drive, Batavia.

Sege is charged with two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance, 5th, and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance, 5th. Paula faces one count of criminal sale of a controlled substance, 3rd, and one count of criminal possesison of a controlled substance, 3rd.

Both are accused of selling a controlled substance to agents of the Local Drug Task Force.

Sege was arrested Friday and jailed on $10,000 bail. Paula turned herself in Monday and was released under supervision of Genesee Justice.

In the second investigation, arrested was Cynthia C. Richardson, 35, of Maple Street, Batavia. 

Richardson is charged with two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance, 5th, and criminal possession of a controlled substance, 5th. 

She is accused of selling a controlled substance to an agent of the Local Drug Task Force.

She was arrested at the courts facility and jailed on $10,000 bail.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 8:36 pm

Fire reported on Lovers Lane Road, Town of Batavia

post by Billie Owens in batavia, fire

Heavy smoke and flames are confirmed in the area of 8487 Lovers Lane Road. Town of Batavia fire is responding.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 4:17 pm

Law and Order: Pair of alleged shoplifters charged with multiple larcenies

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, crime, Pavilion

Thomas E. Hensel, 31, and Tonya D. Smith, 29, are charged with grand larceny, 4th, and conspiracy, 6th. Hensel and Smith were allegedly caught stealing items from the Target store. Upon further investigation, they were found to have allegedly committed additional larcenies during March at Target and Walmart. Hensel was charged with four counts of petit larceny and Smith was charged with one count of grand larceny, 4th, and two counts of petit larceny. Some of the stolen items were recovered.

Amir D. Gifford, 19, of Cherry Street, Batavia, was arrested on a warrant for alleged violation of probation. Gifford turned himself in. He was jailed on $2,500 bail.

Jessica M. Rivera-Mann, 31, of Liberty Street, was arrested on a pair of warrants related to alleged parking violations. Rivera-Mann turned herself in and entered a guilty plea in City Court. and was ordered to pay a $100 fine within 60 days.

Kerri L. Forsberg, 43, of East Main Street, Batavia, was arrested on a warrant for alleged failure to appear on a harassment, 2nd, charge. Forsberg was arrested following a reported incident at UMMC on April 3.

Laura J. Reed, 23, of Walnut Street, Batavia, is charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. Reed was allegedly found in possession of marijuana at 6:18 p.m. April 10 by Officer Jamie Givens.

Kenardo R. Fields, 25, of Ellicott Street, Batavia, is charged with harassment, 2nd, and endangering the welfare of a child. Fields was allegedly involved in a domestic incident at 9:20 a.m., Sunday.

Zachary Michael Burk, 18, of Sparks Road, Pavilion, is charged with petit larceny. Burk allegedly stole a 30-pack of Busch beer from Pavilion Farm Market.

Charles H. Wroten, 54, of Buell Street, Batavia, is charged with aggravated DWI (Leandra's Law), DWI, improper right turn, improper signaling a turn. Wroten was stopped at 11:03 p.m. Tuesday on West Main Street, Batavia, by Sgt. Ron Meides. Wroten is accused of driving while intoxicated with a child less than 15 years old in the vehicle.

Michael Robert Sigl, 22, of Pratt Road, Batavia, is charged with possession of a forged instrument, 2nd. Sigl was arrested on a warrant. He was jailed without bail.

Taylor Nicole Tillotson, 19, of Perry Road, Le Roy, is charged with trespass. Tillotson allegedly returned to College Village after being banned from the property.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 3:52 pm

Two-car accident, minor injuries, blocking traffic at Oak and Prospect in the city

post by Billie Owens in batavia, accident

A two-car accident with minor injuries is reported at Oak Street and Prospect Avenue in the city. It is blocking traffic. City fire and Mercy medics are responding.

UPDATE 3:54 p.m.: An 80-year-old female is complaining of chest pain due to the seat belt.

UPDATE 4:21 p.m.: The patient is being taken to UMMC.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 3:00 pm

Sponsored Post: What's in your mouth?

When I was in dental school, one of our requirements was to fill a certain number of cavities with pure gold. Gold works well in our mouths but very few dentists use gold for fillings anymore. In dental school and after, we placed many silver amalgam fillings in the teeth of our patients. Eventually we would polish them up and marvel at how nice they looked. But, times have changed. Many people these days don’t have any fillings at all. But as far as filling materials go, they do get better and better. Someday, maybe before we completely rid our mouths of tooth decay, we will discover that perfect filling material. What are we using now? Basically, silver amalgam, composite resin and sometimes porcelain.
 
We have been using silver amalgam for 150 years and it is very hard to deny how well it has worked. Amalgam is a mixture of metals. Amalgam fillings are about half silver and half mercury with maybe some tin and copper thrown in. Once mixed, those metals come together to form another substance. We place it in the tooth and it eventually hardens. There may be a very low level release of mercury vapor over time but the overwhelming majority of evidence is that it does little or no harm. Amalgam is easily placed, extremely hard, and no material, to date, will last as long especially if they are small fillings. Some disadvantages besides the mercury content are that amalgam fillings can turn black and become very unattractive. They can also absorb moisture and expand to the point where they can crack teeth. Eventually, all fillings will break down and leak, causing decay around the filling.
 
Many dentists use predominantly the tooth‐colored filling material called composite. This is a particle‐filled resin or plastic material that hardens when exposed to a certain wavelength of light. Composites are bonded to teeth which makes them very strong. And there are many kinds of composites. Some are harder, some are prettier, some are smoother. Unlike amalgam, composites are more difficult or tricky to place, but they have many advantages. Of course they are tooth‐colored. And because they are bonded to the tooth, a dentist takes less tooth structure away, thus preserving more healthy tooth. Also when bonding in composite, larger fillings can be placed without pins or posts that have the possibility of hurting the tooth. In general, resin‐bonded composites will help a tooth stay together as opposed to causing it to break apart. Historically though, composites do wear faster than amalgam, and again, they can be tricky to place.
 
Porcelain is another option. These fillings are made outside of the mouth and then bonded into the tooth. Porcelain is very pretty, very hard and can preserve tooth structure. But it is usually the most time consuming and expensive option. We might see more porcelain restorations in the future as more dental offices become equipped to make them “in‐house”. Of course things keep changing.
 
So, what’s in your mouth? Dr. Russell Marchese Jr. -- 585-343-2711. Like us on Facebook for more information.
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 9:19 am

Photo: Traffic cones on Main Street

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, downtown

A portion of Main Street, Downtown Batavia, was blocked off by traffic cones this morning in advance of clean-up work by city crews along the street and sidewalk. The work is expected to take most of the morning.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 9:10 am

Photos: Oil painting demo by local artist Larry Buckley

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, art, batavia society of artists

Local artist Larry Buckley gave an oil painting demo Tuesday evening at GO ART! for members of the Batavia of Society of Artists.

Other events coming up for the society:

  • Spring Show, opening reception 6:30 to 8 p.m., May 7, Richmond Memorial Library;
  • Steve BonDurant, plein air demo and picnic at Kiwanis Park, 6 p.m., July 14;
  • Joint event with Batavia Players at Jackson Square, free and open to the public, where the players will practice parts and also serve as models for artists, 6 p.m., Aug. 11;
  • Kevin Feary, oil-graisalle demo, Sept. 8;
  • Brian Kemp, acrylic abstract demo, Oct. 13;
  • Dennis Wood, perspective drawing, Nov. 10.

For more information on the Batavia Society of Artists, e-mail bsa.bataviasocietyof [email protected].

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 8:58 am

Batavia boys and girls get track wins over Brockport

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, Batavia HS, sports, track and field

Batavia boys beat Brockport 79-62 Tuesday in a track meet at Van Detta Stadium. The girls won 84-45.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 8:05 pm

Car vs. semi-truck accident with injuries reported at Oak and Richmond

post by Billie Owens in batavia, accidents

A car vs. semi-truck accident with injuries is reported at Oak Street and Richmond Avenue. City firefighters and Mercy medics are responding.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 3:43 pm

Council delays on proposal to deal with vacant and abandoned homes

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, abandoned properties

The Batavia City Council took a step back from a proposal aimed at spurring investment in vacant and abandoned residential properties.

Rather than send a resolution to state representatives asking for legislation to make a tax exemption for investment in such properties possible, the council asked that the proposal be brought back to a future conference meeting.

City Manager Jason Molino warned that with the legislative session under way and ending in June, a delay could decrease the opportunity for timely passage of the legislation.

Councilman Eugene Jankowski took the lead role in opposing passage of the resolution last night.

Jankowski said what little feedback he's gotten on the proposal from constituents is opposition to other homeowners getting a tax exemption not available to them.

He also said he would like to provide residents with more time to digest the proposal and provide feedback to council members.

Molino said the idea that current homeowners are missing out on something is a misunderstanding what the tax exemption is about.

The proposal would provide a limited tax exemption on select owner-occupied properties to offset the significant investment required to rehabilitate vacant and abandoned homes. 

The exemption would be graduated over a number of years, starting at 100 percent of the difference of taxes due on the increase in assessed value that would result from rehabilitation. The homeowner would still pay taxes on the original assessed value.

The exemption is called "gap financing" because it's designed to address the fact that it simply isn't financially realistic to expect somebody to invest tens of thousands of dollars to save a home that has limited value in a market not known for a rapid increase real estate values.

"We're trying to create a tool that attracts investment," Molino said.

The value of the tax exemption, Molino said, would be less than what the city would start receiving in water and sewer payments once the house was occupied again.

In some cases, it would return properties back to tax roles that previous owners have abandoned and allowed to go into foreclosure.

Councilwoman Patti Pacino pointed out that by saving these homes, it would help protect the home values of neighboring residents.

Both Jankowski and Councilwoman Rosemary Christian voted against a motion to suspend the rules for moving the proposal to the same night's business meeting. A rules suspension requires a unanimous vote to pass.

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