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Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 5:38 pm

Accident with injuries reported at Ellicott Street and Ellicott Place, Batavia

post by Billie Owens in batavia, accidents

A motor-vehicle accident with injuries is reported at Ellicott Street and Ellicott Place. City fire and Mercy medics are responding.

UPDATE 5:49 p.m.: The city assignment is back in service.

Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 2:52 pm

Feds raid vapor shop on Ellicott Street for allegedly selling fake products

post by Billie Owens in batavia, crime

An E-cigarette/vapor retail shop at 327 Ellicott St. was raided this afternoon by agents of Homeland Security who had a search warrant for counterfeit E-cigarettes. The shop is across from Hutchins Street in the City of Batavia and has no business name on the outside of the building. The feds are investigating the alleged sale of E-cigarettes made in China but marketed under a competitive brand name.

UPDATE: The business name is A Plus Vapors.

UPDATE: Here's a New York Times piece on China's booming electronic cigarette manufacturing business, including counterfeits.

UPDATE 4:34 p.m.: After initially being told by a federal authority that details would be available later, we're now told the search warrant is still under a court-ordered seal and no more information will be released. We'll continue to try and find out what we can.

Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1:46 pm

Grant moves forward to assist p.w. minor's plans to move jobs from China to Batavia

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, p.w. minor

The first of the necessary paper is being pushed to move jobs from China to the p.w. minor shoe factory in Batavia with the Ways and Means Committee approval yesterday of a resolution to accept a $750,000 grant from the state to assist the company's local expansion.

The county must accept the grant, which passes through the Genesee Gateway Local Development Corp. (a branch of Genesee County Economic Development Center), which will become part of a grant and deferred loan program for p.w. minor.

The grant was approved by Empire Development Corps after the agency encouraged p.w. minor to apply for the grant.

The application pledges 80 new local jobs added over a two-year period, but p.w. minor is planning to transfer a total of 100 jobs over time from China to Batavia.

The LDC will package the $750,000 with $125,000 loan from LDC funds to assist p.w. minor in buying shoe-making machinery.

Mark Masse, VP of business development for GCEDC, laid out the terms of the resolution for members of the Ways and Means Committee, who recommended approval of the resolution to the full County Legislature.

Andrew Young, one of the co-owners the New p.w. minor, is also a member of the Legislature, and while he attended Wednesday's meeting, he was not present during the discussion of the resolution.

Young and local entrepreneur Peter Zeliff, purchased p.w. minor after the previous owners announced plans to close the plant, thereby saving dozens of local jobs at Batavia's oldest, continuously running business.

Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 11:02 am

Motor vehicle accident at Center Street and School Street, Batavia

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, accident

A motor-vehicle accident is reported at Center Street and School Street, Batavia.

Unknown injuries.

City fire and Mercy EMS responding.

UPDATE 11:15 a.m.: No injuries. Two vehicles, moved to parking lot.

Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 9:11 am

School board looking at offering bus rides to city students who live further from schools

post by Jess Wheeler in batavia, City Schools, education, schools

The 157 city school students who live more than a mile and a half from their schools could soon have the option of riding a bus.

Currently, bus transportation isn't offered to students who live within the city boundaries, but the proposal should change the policy.

The district contracts with Student Transportation of America for bus transportation. Under the proposal, BTA will conduct two pick-ups and two drop-offs at designated locations in the city.

Currently, the buses only do one run and pick-up all of the kids on the first pass. 

“We’re paying for time that we aren’t using,” Business Administrator Scott Rozanski said.

The Board was hopeful that the change for transportation would solve concerns that have been raised.

“This would limit the number of students who have to walk well over two miles,” Rozanski said. “They could just walk to their pick-up and then come directly to the high school."

“Ideally, no student will have to walk more than half of a mile to their pick-up destination,” Superintendent Christopher J. Dailey added.

Safety would increase due to less traffic on State Street. Attendance at the high school is expected to improve during the winter when parents might keep their kids at home in bad weather.

The transportation change will be conducted within the parameters of the current contract with Student Transportation of America. There will be no additional cost to the budget or the taxpayers.

The Board of Education thanked Rozanski for his effort to solve the transportation issue Batavia High School has had for several years.

The proposed increased transportation will be added to the ballot which goes to voters on May 19.

Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 8:48 am

Drug Task Force announces three arrests

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, crime

Three people have been arrested as the result of two separate investigations into the illegal sale of narcotics in Genesee County.

In the first investigation, arrested were Sege D. Kalmbacher, 39, of Overlook Drive, Batavia, and Paula R. Kalmbacher, 43, of Overlook Drive, Batavia.

Sege is charged with two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance, 5th, and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance, 5th. Paula faces one count of criminal sale of a controlled substance, 3rd, and one count of criminal possesison of a controlled substance, 3rd.

Both are accused of selling a controlled substance to agents of the Local Drug Task Force.

Sege was arrested Friday and jailed on $10,000 bail. Paula turned herself in Monday and was released under supervision of Genesee Justice.

In the second investigation, arrested was Cynthia C. Richardson, 35, of Maple Street, Batavia. 

Richardson is charged with two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance, 5th, and criminal possession of a controlled substance, 5th. 

She is accused of selling a controlled substance to an agent of the Local Drug Task Force.

She was arrested at the courts facility and jailed on $10,000 bail.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 8:36 pm

Fire reported on Lovers Lane Road, Town of Batavia

post by Billie Owens in batavia, fire

Heavy smoke and flames are confirmed in the area of 8487 Lovers Lane Road. Town of Batavia fire is responding.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 4:17 pm

Law and Order: Pair of alleged shoplifters charged with multiple larcenies

post by Howard B. Owens in batavia, crime, Pavilion

Thomas E. Hensel, 31, and Tonya D. Smith, 29, are charged with grand larceny, 4th, and conspiracy, 6th. Hensel and Smith were allegedly caught stealing items from the Target store. Upon further investigation, they were found to have allegedly committed additional larcenies during March at Target and Walmart. Hensel was charged with four counts of petit larceny and Smith was charged with one count of grand larceny, 4th, and two counts of petit larceny. Some of the stolen items were recovered.

Amir D. Gifford, 19, of Cherry Street, Batavia, was arrested on a warrant for alleged violation of probation. Gifford turned himself in. He was jailed on $2,500 bail.

Jessica M. Rivera-Mann, 31, of Liberty Street, was arrested on a pair of warrants related to alleged parking violations. Rivera-Mann turned herself in and entered a guilty plea in City Court. and was ordered to pay a $100 fine within 60 days.

Kerri L. Forsberg, 43, of East Main Street, Batavia, was arrested on a warrant for alleged failure to appear on a harassment, 2nd, charge. Forsberg was arrested following a reported incident at UMMC on April 3.

Laura J. Reed, 23, of Walnut Street, Batavia, is charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. Reed was allegedly found in possession of marijuana at 6:18 p.m. April 10 by Officer Jamie Givens.

Kenardo R. Fields, 25, of Ellicott Street, Batavia, is charged with harassment, 2nd, and endangering the welfare of a child. Fields was allegedly involved in a domestic incident at 9:20 a.m., Sunday.

Zachary Michael Burk, 18, of Sparks Road, Pavilion, is charged with petit larceny. Burk allegedly stole a 30-pack of Busch beer from Pavilion Farm Market.

Charles H. Wroten, 54, of Buell Street, Batavia, is charged with aggravated DWI (Leandra's Law), DWI, improper right turn, improper signaling a turn. Wroten was stopped at 11:03 p.m. Tuesday on West Main Street, Batavia, by Sgt. Ron Meides. Wroten is accused of driving while intoxicated with a child less than 15 years old in the vehicle.

Michael Robert Sigl, 22, of Pratt Road, Batavia, is charged with possession of a forged instrument, 2nd. Sigl was arrested on a warrant. He was jailed without bail.

Taylor Nicole Tillotson, 19, of Perry Road, Le Roy, is charged with trespass. Tillotson allegedly returned to College Village after being banned from the property.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 3:52 pm

Two-car accident, minor injuries, blocking traffic at Oak and Prospect in the city

post by Billie Owens in batavia, accident

A two-car accident with minor injuries is reported at Oak Street and Prospect Avenue in the city. It is blocking traffic. City fire and Mercy medics are responding.

UPDATE 3:54 p.m.: An 80-year-old female is complaining of chest pain due to the seat belt.

UPDATE 4:21 p.m.: The patient is being taken to UMMC.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 3:00 pm

Sponsored Post: What's in your mouth?

When I was in dental school, one of our requirements was to fill a certain number of cavities with pure gold. Gold works well in our mouths but very few dentists use gold for fillings anymore. In dental school and after, we placed many silver amalgam fillings in the teeth of our patients. Eventually we would polish them up and marvel at how nice they looked. But, times have changed. Many people these days don’t have any fillings at all. But as far as filling materials go, they do get better and better. Someday, maybe before we completely rid our mouths of tooth decay, we will discover that perfect filling material. What are we using now? Basically, silver amalgam, composite resin and sometimes porcelain.
 
We have been using silver amalgam for 150 years and it is very hard to deny how well it has worked. Amalgam is a mixture of metals. Amalgam fillings are about half silver and half mercury with maybe some tin and copper thrown in. Once mixed, those metals come together to form another substance. We place it in the tooth and it eventually hardens. There may be a very low level release of mercury vapor over time but the overwhelming majority of evidence is that it does little or no harm. Amalgam is easily placed, extremely hard, and no material, to date, will last as long especially if they are small fillings. Some disadvantages besides the mercury content are that amalgam fillings can turn black and become very unattractive. They can also absorb moisture and expand to the point where they can crack teeth. Eventually, all fillings will break down and leak, causing decay around the filling.
 
Many dentists use predominantly the tooth‐colored filling material called composite. This is a particle‐filled resin or plastic material that hardens when exposed to a certain wavelength of light. Composites are bonded to teeth which makes them very strong. And there are many kinds of composites. Some are harder, some are prettier, some are smoother. Unlike amalgam, composites are more difficult or tricky to place, but they have many advantages. Of course they are tooth‐colored. And because they are bonded to the tooth, a dentist takes less tooth structure away, thus preserving more healthy tooth. Also when bonding in composite, larger fillings can be placed without pins or posts that have the possibility of hurting the tooth. In general, resin‐bonded composites will help a tooth stay together as opposed to causing it to break apart. Historically though, composites do wear faster than amalgam, and again, they can be tricky to place.
 
Porcelain is another option. These fillings are made outside of the mouth and then bonded into the tooth. Porcelain is very pretty, very hard and can preserve tooth structure. But it is usually the most time consuming and expensive option. We might see more porcelain restorations in the future as more dental offices become equipped to make them “in‐house”. Of course things keep changing.
 
So, what’s in your mouth? Dr. Russell Marchese Jr. -- 585-343-2711. Like us on Facebook for more information.
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